A Passage To Indian Friendship Analysis

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Is it possible for Indians and English people to become friends and tolerate each other 's differences? These differences include race, power, and religion. Can they, in a larger sense, unite together in friendship through collectivism and dharma? The answer is not obtained through the text, A Passage To India, by E.M. Forster; instead, the reader must observe the text and decide an answer to these questions. Through observations, the reader learns that it is necessary that all living creatures overcome their differences in order to have a peaceful life. Whether a person is Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, or muslim, it is necessary to overcome the difficulty of the English and Indian friendship and live in unity. Through complexion and intuition, …show more content…
Fielding even takes Aziz’s side in the rape trial; however, the circumstances puts a strain on their relationship. Their friendship ends up falling apart because Fielding believes Adela should not be required to pay Aziz for the misunderstandings in the rape trial. Fielding stood by Aziz when he was accused, yet he did not believe a woman should be punished for standing up for herself, whether right or wrong. Another circumstance happens when Aziz learns of a death. Fielding says to Aziz, “Your emotions never seem in proportion to their objects” (282). Through this moment between the two, Aziz tries to shame Fielding saying his Englishman “unfairness is worse than [his] materialism” (283). Through the conflict “Fielding could not stand the tension any longer” (283) and he told Aziz of Mrs. Moores death. Although Fielding was a “frank atheist”, he “respected every opinion his friend [Aziz] held” (284). The reader learns that their is a possibility of English and Indian co-existence and acceptance of each other. Although the friendship between the two failed, before it did, they showed a united and peaceful world between those of different cultures. There is a possibility that everyone can unite past their differences, it just may not have been entirely possible yet; however, when it was, the friendship showed that there is a possibility that all living things can be united in love and harmony- at some point in the

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