The Constant Threat of Nuclear Weapons Essay

925 Words 4 Pages
Introduction
Never in history has man had to worry about his existence or even the existence of humans because someone half a world away possessed the capability to end all life on earth. The threat to the human race is at risk each day in a world with nuclear weapons. There are several military revolutions throughout history, but the one that stimulated the greatest change ever in military warfare, is by far, nuclear weapons. They have proven to be the most devastating weapon ever in history, provided as a war deterrent for many, and have allowed for weak countries to become global powers. Nuclear weapons are not just one country’s problem; they are everyone’s. The ability to bring the world to end by one reckless individual is a
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No other weapon in history has had both an instant and generational impact, let alone the ability that one individual could cause this much destruction.
The environmental damages from nuclear bombs have eroded not only land, but all inhabitants causing mass damage to the eco-system. The half-life of one of the by-products of a nuclear bomb, plutonium 239, is over 20,000 years. Because of this, the people who have been exposed to blast sites have been known to have serious health problems that range from various types of cancers to birth defects. Therefore, unlike any other weapon, the everlasting effects from a nuclear bomb last for years making it difficult to recover.
There is no direct solution to handle the aftermath left from a nuclear bomb that will not lead to more human life being affected medically and economically. In all cases where there has been some form of a nuclear explosion, the response teams and cleanup crews have been affected resulting in death. The costs are catastrophic and beyond measure. The attempts to clean up from each incident have costs billions per year and most of them are still contaminated. The costs to decommission the Hanford Nuclear Power in the state of Washington exceeded $2 billion per year for over thirty years, and to this day only half of it has been completed. And this is just an example of an area built to control and contain a nuclear explosion and its by-products versus an area that is just blown up by a bomb.

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