Essay on Black Press Day

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Black Press Day, other wise none as Freedom’s Journal was the anniversary of the founding of the first black newspaper in the US and was established the same year that slavery was abolished in New York State. It changed African Americans forever or colored people.
Black Press day is Freedom's Journal the paper served to counter racist commentary published in the mainstream press. It also provided its readers with regional, national, and international news and with news that could serve to both entertain and educate. It sought to improve conditions for the over 300,000 newly freed black men and women living in the north because it made life so much easier for colored people. It helped readers engage with local, national and
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The people believe this benefited the few that emigrate and survive and as a missionary station the people consider it as a grand and great establishment! Black Press day has changed people perspectives and has made them be respectful for colored people in the world. Three millions that are now in the United States, and the eight millions that in twenty or twenty five years, will be in this country.
Harlem Renaissance is very similar to Black Press day. The Harlem Renaissance resulted in African-American artists gaining the attention of whites and raising awareness by promoting ideas like racial integration and cooperation, which would go on to take effect in the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. African-American artists were able to create and disseminate accurate portrayals of their lives and experiences that combated the negative, racist depictions that existed before the movement. “The Harlem Renaissance experienced a decline in 1930s because of the economic turmoil of the Great Depression. However, the work produced continued to influence generations of writers in the decades following.”(Literature, 2002-2011) Harlem Renaissance is African American culture, particularly in the creative arts, centered in Harlem in New York City. As a literary movement, it laid the groundwork for

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