Summary Of Cabeza De Vaca

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Similarly, Cabeza De Vaca and the whole Florida expedition endured many problems created by the Indians that not only frustrated the Spaniards, but also would later lead to the fatality of all men except for four. “They were people beyond hope and all died that winter of hunger and cold, eating one another.” De Vaca recounts how nothing was going the way of the Spaniards as many began to lose all hope, confidence and were starving to death. The starvation got so horrid that they literally killed one another and began to eat the dead. They had no prior knowledge of the lands whatsoever and because many couldn’t swim, they had to resort to building homemade boats that barely floated on the water and were eventually washed up on a beach where …show more content…
Throughout the book, there were constant Cherokee delegations in Washington, led by Major Ridge, and John Ross would always join to speak out to the president against all the white settlers stealing their land. They would do this every year to get their point across to the presidents. They were not always successful but in this case it worked to perfection. The two million acres of land the men were trying to claim had belonged to the Cherokees and even the Creeks confirmed their possession of the whole south bank of the Tennessee River, according to Ross trying to dispute his case to the president. Therefore, because it belonged to the Cherokees and not the Creeks, it could not possibly be part of the Creek land cession because it never belonged to them. Jackson and Coffee had been improperly laying claim to two million acres. Ultimately this frustrated and annoyed the two men as it disrupted their smooth and fast process of collecting the lands. Unfortunately it was the only time that the Cherokees ever soundly defeated Andrew Jackson in his …show more content…
They had the money, force, connections and outstanding weaponry. What they didn’t have was the sense of anticipation of the Indigenous forces fighting back like warriors. Most of these conquerors’ attitude towards claiming the lands reflected their outcome of the conquest, either in a bad or good way. Andrew Jackson was certainly a successful land grabber who practically reshaped the whole American south and got rid of all the Indians who initially inhabited the part of the country. He to underestimated the determination and grit of the Indians of fighting back, when he and John Coffee were running the lines down the Tennessee River. The conquistadors used their power and force to produce successful conquests instead of deducting treaties. What the Indigenous peoples of the Americas did not realize was that the conquerors and land grabbers did not go after them, but of what they possessed: Gold and real estate, which could be resold for double the value. The Indians were just merely in the way and had to be taken care of first in order to acquire the

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