Advantages And Disadvantages Of Zoroastrianism

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Final Examination
1. Describe the principle concepts which Zoroastrianism is credited with contributing to Western Religions
Zoroastrianism was founded by a prophet Zoroaster who had a vision by high god Ahura Mazda, and reflects an outgoing, universal battle of Ahura Mazda, the good god, and Angra Mainyu, the evil spirit, between the truth and lie while human beings must decide which side they want to choose. Zoroastrianism contributes to Western Religions with eschatology, resurrection, and judgment day. Zoroastrians developed eschatology, the study of the last days, and influenced many others. They predict that world is going to end and on the last day Ahura Mazda will defeat evil, purify the whole world, will reign over it, and all people
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Those were the bishop of Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria, Rome, and Constantinople. The bishop of Rome happened to always be on the winning side of various disputes and thus, was given a title First among Equals, which later caused a lot of problems. When the Muslims conquered Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria, only two bishops were left, and began to fight between themselves. One of their great arguments was the Iconoclastic Controversy – whether to use paintings to tell Biblical stories or not. The bishop of Rome agreed with the use because people could not read; however, the bishop of Constantinople called it adultery. Moreover, the bishops and the regions of their coverage used different languages: the Roman bishop had Latin Rite, the Constantinople bishop had Greek Rite, and they were crossing boundaries, which caused another arguments. The bishop of Rome of that time, Leo IX closed Greek churches in his territory, similarly, the bishop of Constantinople of that time, Michael Cerularius, closed the Latin churches. Leo IX sent Hildebrand to make peace, but Hildebrand wanted to pick a fight. Finally, Leo excommunicated Michael, and Michael excommunicated Leo since they both shared equal power. As a result, the Church was split into the catholic and orthodox factions in 1054 AD in what is called The Great

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