Yukichi Fukuzawa Book Report

1612 Words null Page
Book Report Yukichi Fukuzawa is one of the great founders of modern thinkers that contributed heavily to Japan’s enlightenment. He championed the idea of Western civilization and made the greatest impact within the Japanese culture. He established universities, newspapers, publishers, taught commercial and political undertakings, while doing his best to practice them. Fukazawa wrote a few books during the Edo period and Meiji Period, which have inspired the Japanese culture. His autobiography explains his roots and how he journeys through life from Tokugawa to Meiji. Fukuzawa was the youngest, born into the low-ranking samurai of the Okudaira Clan of Nakatsu on the island of Kyushu. His mother, O-Jun also belonged to a samurai clan of the …show more content…
Some samurai felt the change was too hazardous and preferred the ancient method of living while many other samurai thought about modernizing Japan like the Western world. Fukuzawa felt this was the chance to revolutionize the country’s society for good since he despised the Confucius rigid social-order system of the Tokugawa’s. With this new kind of government, any low-ranking samurai would be able to rise up through studying and be able to take control of the fresh political support system. A yearly stipend was offered to former daimyos and samurai to submit to the new government. The samurai eventually lost their class privileges when it was declared that all people were …show more content…
The opening of Japan and the renovation of Imperial order created something that had never been experienced before in Japan’s history. Domains that were previously owned by former daimyos were given back to the emperor. This in turn would make Japan a central unified state and the domains were changed to prefectures. This change affected all customs, from education to industry, down to food and housing. It was an unexpected jump from the silent seclusion into the light of modernization, but Japan would accept this new culture as its own and have equality as a nation in the world’s stage. Despite the few resistances that Japan encountered and the lateness of entering into the Western conquered world, the domestic transformation advanced with astonishing speediness, drive, and collaboration of others. Fukuzawa had seen Japan’s development and continued to support modernizing Japan. He wrote many books that influenced the minds of young scholars to make them question everything. (Notable works: Sekai Kunizukushi ("All the countries of the world, for children written in verse", 1869), Gakumon no Susume ("An Encouragement of Learning" or "On Studying 1872-1876,") and Bunmeiron no Gairyaku ("An Outline of a Theory of Civilization" 1875) He understood western social history very well while observing his country’s frame

Related Documents