Summary: The Impact Of World War One On Women

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There were many things that impacted women’s lives during World War I. Misogyny, dangerous working conditions, dealing with the loss of lover ones during the war, and having to look after a family on a low paying job are just some of the hard ships women faced during the war. This also came with many new learning experiences, new found confidence in their ability to maintain a job in the work force.

As World War I began, many women realized that they would have to step up and fill the vacated positions that would typically be reserved for men who were now at the war front, “There was initial resistance to hiring women for what was seen as ‘men’s work’”. Despite this, the employment rate after the war had begun had risen by 23.6% (of the working age population) in 1914, to between 37.7% and 46.7% in 1918. This increase shows that as the war progressed, so did the amount of women obtaining jobs, which could be because of high amounts of propaganda, or just high morale. The
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Directly after the war, when many of the men had come back to claim their original jobs, many women were left with very little to do. “I cannot attempt to describe what it now felt like, trying to get accustomed to a woman 's life and a woman 's clothes again… Turning from a woman to a private soldier proved nothing compared with turning back from soldier to ordinary woman. (It was) like losing everything at one fell swoop, and trying to find bearings again in another life and an entirely different world” This quote is an account of what life after the war was like for women, especially for those working in the munitions factories, who made more money than they would make anywhere else. Having to go from that to not working at all proved

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