Gender Roles Of Women During World War II

We live in a world of chaos and dictatorship. A world where you can be killed for having a disability, a world where being too old is a crime, and a world where opinions are never considered. Children are born in factories in test tubes, and our emotions are trapped in a bottle, like a pill we swallow, the poison we ingest. It is what controls our lives. Despite all this, we live in a world that is considered perfect by his Excellency. Hitler, our supreme leader of the United States of America, dictates our world that was once prided on freedom. I lost my husband in World War II, but we all lost more than just loved ones. We lost our freedom. All of the men went to war and all of the women could do nothing more than wait. We waited …show more content…
Society was based on gender roles. Men were accustomed to working and providing financially for the family while women were accustomed to nurturing the family and taking care of the home. A woman could not participate effectively in the workforce because she was expected to simultaneously take care of the household, children, and husband while remaining properly groomed and pretty for their beloved. Adversely, men were admired, favored, and valued as a superior gender in the workforce. Society had contradicting views on men and women. Women essentially worked dainty, unpaid jobs as nurses or teachers while their male counterparts worked hardy, high paying positions in steel mills and rubber manufacturers. Despite women’s unsatisfactory positions in the world before the war began, women proved themselves as being equally capable of audacious jobs as they made rapid advancements in the …show more content…
A woman’s world evolved from being dominated by household projects and unpaid labor to participating in high paying jobs for their beloved men fighting in the military. As the amount of male workers continued to subside, women hustled to apply and train for jobs to perform X-Rays, teach soldiers, and build airplanes. Women had a considerable incentive to remain employed during the war since their husbands and sons were not present to be taken care of. Women also had the opportunity to earn higher wages working in wartime industries than they would have made in jobs that were apparently more appropriate for their gender-role, such as hospitality, laundry, or other service jobs. Between 1890 and 1940, women’s participation in the paid labor force increased from five percent to over sixty percent. The significant contribution that women made to the workforce decreased unemployment levels and helped pull the United States out of an ongoing depression. If women did not take the brave leap to separate from society’s gender roles, the economy could have possibly remained stagnant and not evolved from the financial crises that the United States was experiencing. As women continued to prove themselves worthy by contributing to the workforce, war industries began to seek women through Rosie the Riveter as a

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