Why Is The Constitution A Just Document

1209 Words 5 Pages
The United States Constitution: A just document The United States Constitution has it 's final draft submitted and receives acceptance by thirty-nine of the remaining forty-two delegates today in Philadelphia (Sidlow and Henschen 37). I have received and read a copy of this Constitution given to me by an anonymous source and will go into detail on what this new document proposes. After reading this document, I 'm sure there are many questions that would concern us all. What extent of power does this document give to the new centralized National Government, and how does it affect the several state 's ability to delegate power within themselves? What type of government does this Constitution establish and, is a Constitution truly necessary with …show more content…
After our hard fought battle for Independence, it is imperative that we stay a unified nation, impart by allowing a guiding hand push us forward. A centralized government allows a unified common currency, a formal system of government, and an overall sense of stability within the states. The distribution of power as stated in the Constitution, allows the formation of three branches of government, which consist of, the legislative branch, executive, and judicial. The legislative branch consists of the House of Representatives and the Senate. The House of Representatives is a direct response to the Virginia Plan, one representative per thirty thousand people in the respective state, chosen by the people every two years. The Senate can be seen as a direct representation of the New Jersey Plan, which allows two representatives from each state a seat with one vote each, chosen by the state 's legislature every six years (Sidlow and Henschen 35, A-3). The second branch of government is the executive, which seats the President, who is selected by the Electoral, who cannot be seated in the House of Representatives nor the Senate. The Electoral college, which consists of, “Electors, equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress”, is the sole instrument in deciding who the next president will be, and once elected …show more content…
With the very minor limitations on these few policies, it over all casts a great deal of freedom upon each of the several states, while maintaining order. The ratification by nine states total is necessary to ratify this proposed Constitution and it is my duty as a columnist to further push the acceptance of this profound document. It is in my personal opinion that the states can all come together and understand the proficiency of the proposed form of government, and see the benefits that outweigh the risks. Yes, it is a risky decision to promote such a drastic change when all we have known is the sovereignty of our own individual states, but it is time that we call ourselves the United States of American and truly unite. In Article I Section 8, we can see that it is for our own well being that we approve this document. This section declares that National Government has the authority to, “lay and collect taxes”, “regulate commerce with foreign nations”, “promote the progress of science and useful arts”, “raise and support armies”, and “provide and maintain a navy” (Sidlow and Henschen A-5). It also can be

Related Documents