Why Did Chiang Kai-Shek Lose Control Of China?

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1. How did Chiang Kai-shek lose control of China?
Chiang Kai-shek lost control of China not because of the intervention of foreign powers, but due to the various domestic problems in China. Although the CCP received assistance from the Soviet Union and Stalin’s advice to overthrow the Nationalists, it only contributed to the Communists’ victory by a small amount. This was because Chiang’s Nationalist government angered both the peasants and middle class due to the government’s inability to solve economic problems and rising inflation. As many Chinese became less optimistic, many turned to the CCP as a new hope of opportunity that would mean a better future. As a result, those who once supported Chiang turned against him by siding with the CCP to overthrow him.
2. Why was President Truman criticized for his response to the communist revolution in China?
President Truman was criticized for his response to the communist revolution in China due to the CCP’s ability to grow their influence not only in China but also in neighboring territories. Therefore, communism continued to spread, which was against the ideologies of many Americans. In a way, the blame that Truman’s administration associated with the disastrous
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In order to contain the spread of communism, the United States provided aid to South Vietnam, who was anti-Communist, in order to preserve democracy while it was still alive in eastern Asia. Furthermore, preventing Vietnam from becoming communist would mean that China would not have another communist ally. Unfortunately, by 1963, South Vietnam was on the verge of collapse, hence President Lyndon Johnson sent U.S. combat troops to South Vietnam. On the other side, China and the Soviet Union were providing aid to North Vietnam, which increase tensions to such an extent that thousands of troops were stationed at both

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