Why College Students Should Go To College

1550 Words 7 Pages
It’s hard to believe that once upon time, Americans did not have the dreadful worries of finding a way to prepare for the financial necessities for college. Now, college is becoming more of a dream rather than a reality as high tuition rates becomes the number one reason why Americans are not advancing themselves into higher education. In some cases, there are college students who receive full-ride scholarships to the college they desire; however, the majority of those who do go to college do not obtain the same luck. Those students who do continue their education and go off to college find themselves short of financial aid, out-of-pocket cash, and even scholarships. This causes students to resort to taking out a student loan. The tuition, …show more content…
Part of the reason why I pushed myself to go into college was because it’s a known fact that getting a well-paid job without a college degree is rare. Minimum wage can barely help one survive. There are also statistics that people hear that even with a bachelor’s degree, one must obtain a higher degree in order to have a well-paying career. Though getting a master’s degree may be the main goal, the financial costs add up, making the journey a hassle rather than a beautiful …show more content…
It is reported that the United States is continuously increasing the college tuition rates; it is predicted that if the costs continue to rise, the affordability will lower for the middle-class. Meanwhile, countries such as Germany and Finland are the polar opposite of the United States – when it comes to post-secondary education. In Germany, college tuition fees and debt are seemingly nonexistent. As of today, Germany has abolished tuition fees. To understand this, Germany is publicly funded and is a federal country that has sixteen autonomous states that control issues pertaining to education. Over 80 percent of the tuition costs are supported by the German states, relieving students from student loan debt. (Kehm). Similar to German education, Nordic countries also provide free tuition to their locals. Except recently, Nordic countries have agreed to lower tuition rates for international students. The funding for these universities are similar to Germany; they are publicly funded. Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Iceland receive over 90 percent of their financial aid from public funding. As stated in a current report, Nordic countries believe in

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