What Was Vidal's Contribution To The Professionalization Of Geography?

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Register to read the introduction… He wanted to help make improvements of the teacher’s knowledge and make other resources available to their students. Vidal also contributed many works over his years such as 17 books, 107 articles and 240 reports and reviews (Wiki). He had written a famous elementary book for geography but is his two best know works are probably the Tableau de la Geographie de la France written in 1903 and Principles of Human Geography written in 1918. He like other Geographers we will talk about like Ratzel saw geography as a natural science concerned with terrestrial unity. This goes along with his idea of genre de vi which can be explained as the belief that the lifestyle of a particular region reflects the economic, social, ideological and psychological identities imprinted on the landscape (Wiki). All these ideas had given upcoming geographers to grow more then ever which in return lead to the professionalizing of geography. The next person we can begin to talk about is William Morris Davis. Like Vidal, who was the Father of French Geography, Davis was the Father of American Geography. Davis was born in Philadelphia and when he grew up he went to Harvard and obtained a Masters of Engineering in 1870. After Harvard he did some work in Córdoba, Argentina. Davis soon started to work at Harvard as an instructor in …show more content…
Ratzel was German Geographer who was around during the time of the New Geography in German. This was touched upon in the beginning of this paper. The New Geography in Germany was huge due to the new fact that The University of Berlin was allowing the choosing of discipline in geography so students can narrow in on the topic that interest them. Before this Geography was always taught as a general study incorporating all different aspects. Ratzel had two political impacts on his career and that was the unification of Germany in 1871 and his part taking in the Franco-Prussian War where he was wounded …show more content…
Some were influenced by others works like Vidal and Ratzel who shared ideas of geography as a natural science concerned with terrestrials. A lot of these geographers shared ideas of humanistic geography as well. When you look at each and every aspect that each one of these men contributed you can see who geography professionalized. It turned from Ancient and not always correct concepts to a group of famous geographers who helped create the many disciplines that now make up the general study of Geography. Their ideas are still prevalent today and help new upcoming geographers understand to how we got to where we are

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