What Is The Effect Of Concussions In Football

1989 Words 8 Pages
From what I can remember, football has become a Sunday ritual in my family since I was a kid. Growing up in the North East, we lived a couple hours from Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens, New York. Being the playing ground for the New York Jets 1964 to 1983, now the New York Jets play at MetLife Stadium, in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Living so closed to the stadium and having family members like my Dad, Uncles, and Grandfather take the train or a boat over to watch Joe Namath play was an experience I wish I could have been a part of. Football has become so popular in America, that they have a day dedicated to watching your favorite team play their hardest vs one of the other thirty-one teams in the league. Once being a …show more content…
However, the equipment is not the only problem, the concussion protocol that is required to be done after a big play, makes the experts question the effectiveness of diagnosing a head injury. Former star for the Detroit Lions, Calvin Johnson, also one of the most prolific wide receivers to ever play the game, chose to retire last offseason at the age of 30 due to his fear of his already long medical record that was tested during his time in the NFL. In Calvin’s first major interview after his retirement, he told ESPN’s Michael Smith this, “Concussions happen," Johnson said. "If not on every play, then they happen like every other, every third play, you know. With all the helmet contact, guys hitting the ground, heads hitting ground. It 's simply when your brain touches your skull from the movement or the inertia, man. It 's simple to get a concussion." Being one of the greatest wide receiver to every play the sport of football, heads turned about concussions after this interview was …show more content…
From the first football game ever played till now, the development of safety equipment has sky rocketed tremendously from the first leather helmet to the now hard plastic shelling with thick padding in the inside. The classic idea of a helmet that have been used since 1893, is to wrap the players head in a tough external shell. Overtime the evolution of helmets have had significant improvements in reduced lacerations and skull fractures, however, the ability to prevent brain injury has been limited. Helmets can help reduce the size of impact forces but they cannot counter the brain from moving within the skull. An invention called the Q-Collar, incorporates a different approach to attempt to do that. Slightly clamping down on a player’s jugular veins, causes the brain to swell and fit more snug inside the brain. Already tests have been done and have shown major improvements however, the Q-Collar has not yet received Food and Drug Administration approval yet, and more research is still needed. Not only could this have major benefits in athletics, this could also benefit automobile accidents and military operations. More than just developing safe equipment is being done. The simple modification from changing what the sport of football is played on to help reduce concussions are

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