What Is The Difference Between Free Will And Determinism?

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The issue of Free will and Determinism arise from the terms themselves. Free will can be defined as: “agents that are strongly, and naturally, inclined to believe that what they do, it is of their own free will” (our actions have the motives that we (the agent) determined and want). Determinism, on the other hand, means to outlook every event, including choice and action as determined (i.e. completely caused or inevitable). However, determined means in this statement “causally determined” not fated. These two terms (determinism and fated) are not the same theories, fated means that events it will happen, however determinism is set in stone similar to predetermined events. The real problem derives from the motivation behind the two theories …show more content…
A neutral stance to this is the claim that “ one can be held morally responsible for one’s actions only if one could have acted otherwise in a given set of circumstances.” (The Philosophical Review, page 440). Determinist would disagree with this claim because it is if an agent is never in control of the situations that they are forced into, how can they be morally responsible. Free will does not easily tie into the premise because if we choose our own action then we should be held morally reasonable for them, but if one said that “X” did Y because she/ he could it fails to prove moral responsibility and seems as if our action or arbitrary or random. However if an act is described as “not determined” or “uncaused” that means that free will cannot be used because the action is random therefore not in the agent’s power, thus making morally responsibility invalid. Simply, without the just the agent being the cause of an action, they cannot be held to moral …show more content…
Such as if determinism is true,” (a) we cannot act any other than we do; so, we aren’t morally responsible for what we do” (The Philosophical Review, page 442). Meaning that someone who is not in control of their actions or the events that take place because of it is just as much of a victim as the people or things effected by it. (B) If indeterminism is true, our actions are random; so they aren’t free; so we aren’t morally responsible for what we do” (The Philosophical Review, page 442). Indeterminism is the view that some events are not determined and does tie into free will. Although they are not interchangeable, it is not plausible to have indeterminism without referring to free will. If an agent’s actions are random and without cause, do they have really the free will do an action if they are not in control. Furthermore, if they do have free will then the action would not be random. (C) Either determinism or indeterminism must be true, meaning that only one of the propositions are correct but neither can be at the same time. (D) So we are never morally responsible for what we do (punishing an agent is intelligible since the blame does not lie with

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