W. E. B. Dubois Impact On Education

Scholar W.E.B. DuBois once said, “When you have mastered numbers, you will in fact no longer be reading numbers, any more than you read words when reading books, you will be reading meanings” (Brainyquote). Learning was more than just reading numbers and books, it was about understanding them and being able to apply the knowledge that one gained from reading. As the co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored people and first African American to earn his Ph.D. from Harvard University, he understood the importance of education in the race torn United States (Wosmer, 2002). The emphasis on education and comprehension opens up a world of opportunities for not only African Americans, but people in general. Malcolm X, a …show more content…
DuBois for short, grew up in the 1870’s nearly unhindered by the racism of the south, as well as in a predominately white area. He attended Fisk University and eventually became the first African American to get a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Dubois held “the talented tenth” in extremely high regard, because that was the ten percent of the black community who would raise the rest of the population up. He believed that equality with whites was a major key in success (Black Education). DuBois believed that education and work were the means to raise people as a whole. The only way for the “Negro” to gain social and economic equality was through education and those elite of society who could “hold their own”. Though his actions for education were not a direct, they were critical in the foundation of education, mainly vocational and technical. His input was influential in providing secondary education institutions of the South a stable approach to freed slaves as well as their children (Frantz, N., & Howell, R. T. 1997). While teaching at Atlanta University, he published two of his major projects; Black Reconstruction: An Essay Toward a History of the Part Which Black Folk Played in the Attempt to Reconstruct Democracy in America 1860-1880, and Dusk of Dawn. The essay itself focusses on many W.E.B. DuBois themes such as the part African Americans play in the construction of the US, and the importance of encouraging African American …show more content…
After finishing his Bachelor of Science degree in Law from Northwestern University in 1929, he was diagnosed with poliomyelitis which put him on crutches forever, but he refused to let his physical ailment stop him. He earned a Ph.D. in sociology and a M.A. in economics from the University of Chicago, before teaching at colleges such as Wiley College, the Tuskegee Institute, Lincoln University, as well as Wayne State University. Cox wrote four books Caste, Class, and Race, The Foundations of Capitalism, Capitalism and American Leadership, and Race Relations: Elements and Social Dynamics between the years of 1948 and 1978 (Lawson). According to an article on encyclopedia.com, he created a theory that explained ideology was responsible for producing a social system in which black people were considered inferior to whites” (Thomson, 2008). He also researched the history of race antagonism, which he found started in the 15th century during the growth of capitalism and nationalism. Through his research, he found that race issues were not ordinary or widespread occurrence, but a specific ideology that became lodged into social theory. In the book Caste, Class and Race, according to encyclopedia.com, Cox discusses major sociological theories looking at

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