The Black Press Analysis

Improved Essays
The film “The Black Press” explains the effects of African American newspapers on social and political life in America. Navigating life after slavery was often guided by the images and ideas seen in mainstream media. The press attempted to counteract the images of vilification and oppression by giving blacks as sense of worth and power. The press created a sense of control for black Americans that would allow them to change the course of history.
After decades of vilification and oppression without any power, African Americans found a new freedom in the press. A sense of control loomed over the black community when the first black newspaper, “Freedom’s Journal,” was published in 1827. John Russworm and Samuel Cornish were selected as
…show more content…
A prime example is the Great Migration of blacks from the South to the North and west. Hundreds of thousands of African Americans fled from the South in search of a better life and fairer wages. What they found had little difference than the Jim Crow laws ruling the South. In the North, they did often find better wages but there was still so much racism and segregation in the North. Northerners saw blacks as competition in the job market because they were hired in place of union workers who went on strike. The Chicago Defender was an black newspaper that was immensely popular. At its peak, it would reach at least 500,000 African American readers a week. The Chicago Defender advocated tirelessly for blacks to come to live in northern cities. This false image of progressive treatment drove people to find employment in the North. Because the Chicago Defender was a major voice for African Americans, its followers took the advice seriously. The press was as powerful enough as to make major life decisions for some people. Needless to say, the southern economy declined even further than it was after the Civil War. Southerners despised blacks but depended on them for the backbone of their economy. Now that cheap labor was scarce, southerners retaliated towards this movement. Some even thought that blacks were “biologically incompatible” with the North’s cold weather. The Great Migration was motivated by The Chicago Defender and other black newspapers urging everyone to move north. Not only did the press have readers but it also had the power to start a movement that would change the course of history. The main idea that comes to mind when notified of the southern economy starting to fail again is that racism is, like everything else in this country, an economic consequence. Money motivates people to commit acts they wouldn’t dare

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    As it has been throughout history, during the war African Americans were treated as a lesser species. Many blacks travelled north in hope of a new start and opportunity. Going north to a promise of work soon proved to be nothing but a sham because racial discrimination was alive and well, rearing its ugly head and limited the number of black received work (Document 22). Aside from women and children blacks were seen as another resource for the war industry, which saw potential harmony through utilization of black and white labor. Those African Americans, who were lucky enough to find work still encountered racial discrimination.…

    • 1172 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The North had believed otherwise, that slavery was taking more jobs away from the whites and argued that slavery was hurting the economy rather than boosting it. The only people who did not profit off anything was the slaves working the free labor, the black population. The war began due to the struggle of trying to preserve the union, not the struggle of trying to free the slaves. Though the fight to free the slaves benefited black people all around America and derived from morals and ethic, they were not prioritized. Lincoln having a personal dislike of slavery, was willing to tolerate it in some states if it meant preserving the union.…

    • 1516 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    At this time, it was the nations leading African American newspaper. Many job opportunities were advertised in this newspaper but so were black social issues. Whenever lynchings occurred, they were often discussed in the Chicago Defender. After a number of serious incidents, the Defender’s publisher, Robert Abbot, was convinced that the Migration was an effective tactic for hurting the white South and a real opportunity for African Americans to live in freedom (The Atlantic). In fact, after seeing the impact on the southern economy, Abbot embraced the movement, calling it a “Second Emancipation” (The…

    • 1151 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The confidence in the South ended up leading to its defeat in the civil war, along with the morally wrong in slavery. After getting overly oppressed, the idea of freedom, equality and human rights was growing inside of every black slave. Not only slavery brought great success to the South’s economy before the civil war, but it also stabbed the South’s back by pushing them inflated to a critical point and inevitably…

    • 927 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Black war veterans returned home very fed up, and the beginnings of the Black working and middle classes had origins during the war. World War 2 was very influential only because the Great Depression and First Great Migration had brought about small changes that allowed for Black workers to be able to acquire wealth during the war. But there were other important factors that led to the Civil Rights Movement besides World War 2. Most importantly, Blacks all over the country had been fighting for civil rights for literal decades, such as those with the NAACP. Additionally, younger Blacks had always been less willing to accept Jim Crow over generations, and those sentiments were becoming more visible in the 1950s and…

    • 1589 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Black Bold Creative The emergence of the Harlem Renaissance in 1938 was some form of the celebration of the African American culture with the main focus on creative arts. This happened after both the Americans and Africans had experienced bondage of slavery, which unified them. They had moved from the rural south in search for a better life to the urban North because there were several industrial factories in the south and cheap labour was available. The Northerners were not pleased with the arrival of the Southerners as they claimed that they took most of their jobs, rendering the northerners jobless. The black culture took its pride during this period, and this is clearly reflected in the world today.…

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Black Aristocracy

    • 1075 Words
    • 4 Pages

    And many did not realize that despite their skin color, education and adopted behaviors, they were still African Americans in a racially segregated country that limited black movement within the larger socioeconomic sphere. Similarly to Dr. Mary Pattillo’s assertion of the contemporary middle class, these black elites were in a highly susceptible position because most white Americans were still highly racist and would rather uplift another white person than a black one. And with the swelling numbers of European immigrants migrating to America, they began replacing black elites in service jobs while a newly emerging white middle class also shut them out. The new white upper class began distancing themselves by migrating away from urban communities and further restricting blacks from entering their establishments to perform work. And the association to whites, which helped to create their status level, would ironically be their demise and the driving force behind their involuntary assimilation with the darker skinned blacks they isolated.…

    • 1075 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Citizens began to feel as though the middle class was ruling society and started to revolt. Marx was committed to radical social change, and while Langston Hughes might not have agreed with what Marx wrote, he too was a champion of change. Hughes was an influential writer and member of his community during the Harlem renaissance. He was a voice for the underprivileged and fought for recognition of African American artists. Due to the real estate failure in Harlem in the early 1900s, many white owned properties were rented out to black tenants.…

    • 815 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Great Migration started pre-World War II, in the 1900s to the 1930s. This migration of people mostly consisted of African Americans looking for a better living, where they’d have better jobs and would not be entrapped in a cycle of abuse from southern white men. This abuse consisted of Jim Crow Laws, lynching, sharecropping, and discrimination of their civil rights. When more African Americans came to the north, racial tensions deepened. Cities were becoming even more populated and jobs could be found easily in factories.…

    • 973 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Sugrue furthermore illustrates this as he states, “Taking advantage of the ready supply of black men, many white construction workers subcontracted black workers for a fraction of the regular hourly wage” (Sugrue 119, 2005). These private companies again capitalized off the racist agenda of white management to create surplus profit and further impoverish African Americans in Detroit. Due to this racial discrimination African Americans struggled to find an decent and affordable place to…

    • 1132 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays