The Tuskegee Syphilis Study Summary

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SUMMARY

The Tuskegee Syphilis study is considered to be one of the United States’ darkest periods of history dealing with the health care system. It has led to one of the largest reasons why American Blacks are very distrusting of the health care system in the United States. The study has also lead to the belief that this was a form of genocide against colored people. The study, which lasted for 40 years, from 1932 – 1972, was conducted on black men who had contracted syphilis and it was believed to be studying the disease in order to improve treatment options for patients that suffer from syphilis. The men had agreed to be tested and treated, but, they did not realize the study’s true purpose. The study’s leading researchers started the
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Robert Philips, the man interviewed in the video, talks about how the effects of the Tuskegee Syphilis study impact his medical care that he receives. He and many other African-Americans look at they study as being more recent experience that their race has underwent and this experience was not a good one. The African-American population was greatly deceived by the doctor and researchers who ran the study and it still has a major impact on how the black population view and are treated in the United States’ health care system. Even after all of the that has happened in history between the blacks and whites, there is still racial discrimination occurring, especially in the health care setting. Philips points out in the video that white men at the clinic where he is, have either already had transplants or are going to have transplants. The black men on the other hand, as Philips describes, “are in it for the kind of in it for the long haul.” This is the product of distrust between the patient and doctor, but also the product of racial discrimination. This is something that no one wants in to see in the health care field. Every person, not matter what race or origin, should be viewed equally and be treated based on their illness and not their appearances. A major step that must be taken in order to head in the right direction is the formation of trust between African-Americans and their doctors. The formation of this trust will allow the patient to benefit from the treatment and to have a sense of belonging amongst the white population in the United

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