What Is Moral Rights?

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1. A right is the sovereignty to act without the permission of others. An individual’s entitlement to something; a person right’s is when that person acts in a certain way toward him or her. A right is morally good, justified or acceptable. Legal rights are rights that are attained from a legal system that allows a person to act ways toward that person. Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings. The basic rights and freedom to which all humans are considered to be entitled, whether to nationality, sex, religion, colour or language. Human rights include the rights to life, equality and freedom. Moral norms and principles or rules state that all humans are allowed to do something or have something done for them. Rights are …show more content…
2. Three (3) features of moral rights are that moral rights are natural; they are discovered not created. They are equal; no injustice in how they are shared. Moral rights cannot be taken away from an individual without consent and they are the same; they are universal no matter where a person is moral rights are the same.
3. Moral rights are related, an individual’s rights can be defined in terms of their duties others have towards that individual. Duties are moral obligations. For instance, a person has a moral right to do something then it is the moral duty of the other person not to interfere. Moral rights provide a person to be free to choose to do whatever they choose to do. Moral rights are justified by moral standards that most people acknowledge. Moral rights advocacy was first championed by a German philosopher; Immanuel Kant who many feel was the central figure of modern philosophy. Kant first expressed that from a moral perspective we are all equal thus he maintained that we all have worth or dignity that society must respect. This belief was categorized by Kant as Practical Imperative which interpreted is to “Act to treat humanity, whether yourself or another, is an end-in-itself”
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It was long believed humans know what is right and wrong and are capable of knowing what is lawful and unlawful. John Locke, an English political philosopher long ago postulated that man have rights by nature. He is credited with developing the idea that humans should display the natural right, to liberty and a natural right to private property. Locke argued that if authorization of a people were not present then us as human beings would then adopt a state of nature. In this state of nature, humans know what is right and wrong and are capable of knowing what is lawful and unlawful as nature teaches us that we have a natural right to liberty. Locke’s belief is that the state of nature can be dangerous, so individuals went about organizing themselves into a political body to protect their lives and property. However due to governments limitations, power of protection can only extend far enough to protect every basic rights. Locke explains that the best theory of the right to property is embedded in the fact that each person owns all the labour that he performs. All the products and objects gained through labour becomes private property. He also believes that property is a natural right, as life and liberty; he states that it should have limits. The limitations to private property are that, because God wants all his children to be happy, no man can take possession of something if he harms another in doing so. He cannot take possession of more than he can use,

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