Thomas Jefferson Apess Analysis

Superior Essays
Apess is a unique story of a Pequot Native American who, instead of finding an inherited spirituality from his biological ancestors, found the Methodist church to be his calling. This man was born into a world that mistreated him, abused him, and tried to deny him his humanity. Through these struggles and hardships, he found his spiritual side. Although it took years of searching, he wound up at a Methodist Church after several trials and tribulations. He was at one point an indentured servant, and he later went on to fight in the war of 1812; according to his biography, if it wasn’t for his indentured servitude he would have never joined the war effort where he found his calling as a minister. This is a man who is extremely representative …show more content…
For Jefferson, his cataloging of the political spheres that developed over time to favor religious freedom was an important cultural production of it’s own. Jefferson’s observations were a body of work that let people of the early Republic see a current point of view; a point of view in which the imagined communities of the early Republic came together as a whole. Although Jefferson’s notes were only a part of the work that he contributed to the founding of the country, the notes hold a great cultural and political significance since they helped explain and develop a portion of the ideology behind some of the Bill of Rights. Apess’ autobiography was also a form of cultural production; however, Apess also made direct contributions to the methodist church; he made contributions that not only addressed the marginalized peoples deprivation- but worked to change it. Apess knew that it was his right to believe whatever he felt inclined to believe. A part of his belief lead him to realize that equality for marginalized Natives was his burden to bare. Both of these men produced similar ideologies of religious freedom and freedom of the self through religion; these ideologies cultivated the foreground of religious policy within the early Republic. Not to mention, they, particularly Apess, also began a tradition of religion-based ideology in support of equality for all people in the early Republic, which was repeated much later by people like Martin Luther King Jr. who used methods of religious sermons to fight for equality of the oppressed people of his

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    I believe that because of the central state’s independence on religious matters, the American people have unconsciously felt the need to express their belief in the United-States. Two centuries before Bellah introduced his theory, Rousseau said: “tolerance should be given to all religions that tolerate others, so long as their dogmas contain nothing contrary to the duties of citizenship”. This quote gives us insight on Bellah’s own theory. As a matter of fact, by saying that the duties of citizenship have to be a priority upon individual religious beliefs, Rousseau corroborates the idea that being an American citizen is the supreme religion…

    • 1413 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    earned from his jobs, Frank went back to America for a better job and life, hoping that one day he’ll be able to bring his family back to the land of opportunity. Summary (Brothers Under a Same Sky) The book, “Brothers Under a Same Sky”, is written in multiple perspectives and has the setting jump from past to present. However, the main perspective the book is written in is through the eyes of Nam Ki. Born on a Wahiawa sugar plantation, Nam Ki lived with his mother and three siblings. He was “one Christian fanatic” and often brought embarrassment to his older brother, Nam Kun, when he openly discussed his faith.…

    • 673 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    (Scherr) He embraced a symbolic relationship between church and state. Even though he was very religious and believed that there was someone looking out for him and his family. He did not believe in the afterlife. Jefferson lived in a time where all he knew was slavery. He grew up with a father that owned slaves and ended up marrying someone who owned a lot of slaves.…

    • 879 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He helped propel America towards independence with his actions and words, helped with the war effort against Britain, and had an important role in independent America’s government. First of all, Samuel Adams helped propel America to independence with his words and actions. TCi states that some people could argue that he demoralized the Americans by being a tax collector who worked for the British, but that simply is not the whole side of the story. Samuel…

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    His passion for religious freedom was not just for one sect or belief system, but rather for all religions. This strong belief in religious freedom was not something that Washington believed in only for political gain, but was important to him in every aspect of his life. Jeffrey Morrison points out in his book The Political Philosophy of George Washington that “Washington demonstrated religious tolerance toward hired laborers at Mount Vernon”. Perhaps the best way to determine if someone believes what they say is to watch their actions, and Washington clearly believed and lived out his desire for religious pluralism and freedom in every aspect of his life. His fair treatment of his laborers is an example of…

    • 2040 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The first argument for the inclusion of religion and politics is the solid empirical evidence that religion is a road for liberation and furthering of right as demonstrated by the Civil Rights Movement in the US or the different liberation movements in colonial states whether in Latin America, Africa or Asia. This counters the secularists argument that the law treats everyone equally and that the constitution is the epitome of justice. Time and again, the constitution proved to be grounds for discrimination such as in Slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the US, or the illegality of same-sex marriage in most countries around the world until very…

    • 1603 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Kennedy was becoming an advocate for civil rights; some would say a Martyr of Lincoln. He wanted the nation to be one culture together made of many smaller cultures. Since he was a liberalist he was all about being equal and how to change that in America. Kennedys biggest influence in his civil rights was Martin Luther King Jr. and obviously the efforts of Abraham Lincoln. Abraham Lincoln tried to make civil rights understood by every person and he used the bible in a way which christians understood them to realize he was speaking truth.…

    • 1633 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Thomas Paine’s motivational pamphlet “The American Crisis” was effective for common colonialists in the 1770s and 1780s because it emotionally appealed to unity and religious faith through euphony, analogy, and rhetorical question, which convince readers to fight against England for independence. He argued that since God supported them and this would overcome the physically powerful British army, the colonies had to protect themselves against the oppression that he claimed Britain was unfairly instilling on them. His evidence and logic are effective throughout the pamphlet, but small choices in words and phrase structure also support his ideas by creating euphony to side with God and simplify his meaning for uneducated and busy readers through…

    • 1511 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Since God created us, we can reason that God wants everyone to be happy. Locke stated the freedom of man “is grounded on his having reason, which is able to instruct him in that law he is to govern himself by, and make him known how far he is left to the freedom of his own will” (Barker, 1960, p.36). Other key theories included rule of government, that every individual have the moral obligation to rebel against a government that has lost sight that it exists for the people’s benefit only. The right of private property theory, revealing that every man had a right to self-preserve, survive and be happy. Also, theory of knowledge, that all knowledge come from and through experience, that beginning at birth, we experience our world through our five senses, filling our minds with ideas.…

    • 1239 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Freedom Of Religion Today

    • 957 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Upon arrival, British colonists left little room for Native cultures and beliefs to influence them when settling down. They enjoyed new freedoms and were willing to fight to maintain the ability to worship however they saw fit. Freedom of religion one of our core values in today’s society, was taken for high regard at the time of the colonial revolution, varying from the old ways of the European rules and regulations of the church. When settling in, the young colonies priority was to be able to practice in peace, although they still needed to obtain the rights to do as they pleased here as well by overtaking the Natives already living here. The puritan’s believed that the religion in England needed to be…

    • 957 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays