Childhood And Imagination In The Adventures Of Alice In Wonderland By Lewis Carroll

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Age has always been an issue of mind over matter. Just as age is not limited by how one looks or feels, imagination does not either. It is often the case that age limits imagination, but that is not the true. No one can blame themselves for wanting that sense of creativity to live within for as long as possible, which is exactly how Alice felt throughout her journey. In The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll uses references to his own past, Alice’s change in size, and imagery to show that people can keep elements of childhood, like imagination, forever.
It is well known and quite obvious that childhood only lasts for a short amount of time before becoming an adult. It is not easy to let go of farcical games in the front yard of
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Those few words that make no sense to those who they are spoken to but makes total sense to them. In addition to Carroll’s life and Alice’s alternations, imagery is used to depict the effect of age on childhood and imagination. As mentioned before, Alice struggled with the idea of growing. It was so much of a struggle that “all she could see, when she looked down, was an immense length of neck, which seemed to rise like a stalk out of a sea of green leaves that lay gar below her” (39). This shows that Alice is going through a period of adolescence, but she continues to use her imagination to keep her connected to her childhood and showing that childhood can last forever. Furthermore, Alice’s sister also imagines Alice as she grows older but is still dreams like a child by saying, “how she would keep, through her riper years the simple and loving heart of childhood” (94). This suggests that the point of stories help maintain childhood imagination to all that learn them. Also, it shows that the most important lesson is to somewhat lean on childhood in order to get through adulthood. Carroll expresses these last few lines in the story make it clear that the preservation of imagination throughout life is important to

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