The White Man's Burden Summary

1863 Words 8 Pages
The institution of slavery was part of a significant portion of American history, along with human history. Additionally, it is also one of the greatest human tragedies of the New World and the United States. The White Man's Burden: Historical Origins of Racism in the United States was written by Winthrop D. Jordan and tells the history of racism in the United States. The author discusses the very origins of racism and the nature of slavery within the United States through the attitudes of the white slave owners. In the book, the author addresses the problem of slavery through the negative stereotypes, racist laws, and the paradox of Thomas Jefferson.
The African slave lost their humanity from the very moment they boarded the European slave ship. When they arrived in the New World, they were forced into labor. Even a slave’s unborn child would be cursed into the institution of slavery since “slaves born in the New World had no experience or direct knowledge of what is was like to live as free people” The African slave has been a victim of negative stereotypes throughout the history of the United States. The foundation of this negative stereotype originates from the idea
…show more content…
Jordan is able to analyze the problem of slavery through the negative stereotypes, racist laws, and the paradox of Thomas Jefferson. Ultimately, Winthrop D. Jordan wrote The White Man's Burden: Historical Origins of Racism in the United States to explain the origins of racism in the United States. In addition, the author wanted the reader to have a complete understanding that “white American attitudes toward black have done a great deal to shape and condition American responses to other racial minorities.” The institution of slavery was one of the greatest human tragedies in the United States. While slavery came to an end in 1865, racism would not end. In conclusion, the problem of slavery was that slavery was a white over black issue and that it was a white man’s

Related Documents