The Role Of Media In The Media

847 Words 4 Pages
The role of media in everyday life has changed dramatically over the past 100 years, evolving and helping to shape the future of society. From printed press, radio, T.V. broadcasts, and social media, the information is seen by almost everyone. The role of media in our lives is to inform us of current events and keep society focused and updated on important matters. While this may seem to be a simple task it has turned into a very complex ordeal in modern day America. The news has evolved into many different outlets; ABC News, Fox News, CNN News, just to name a few, and they all take different perspectives on current issues and choose to show different material. The media in this instance must all compete for viewers. They compete with local …show more content…
Police, being the defenders of the public, stress having an important relationship with the public and how the departments reach out to the public. Police try to create and maintain a relationship with the public so that their work is viewed as effective and necessary. Increasingly, police are trying to build closer relationships with the media to help broadcast that the police are serving an important function and their actions should be supported. However, when negative media arises surrounding police use of force and brutality, evidence points to citizens believing that police do not fairly enforce the law and that police brutality exists (Graziano (2010) 56). Also, some believe that after a well-publicized incident, the perception of the public will take years to finally be forgotten and for faith in police actions to be restored (Graziano (2010) 56). This possesses a significant problem for police, their reputation is vital to their work and the support from their communities ultimately relies on the police’s success in fighting …show more content…
In a report by the National Institute of Justice, it shows that only 2% of police interactions threaten or use force (Smith et al., 2009). Police use of force is not nearly as common as the public has perceived it to be. Police, however, are now more aware than ever that their actions when it comes to the use of force will be videotaped and reviewed by more than just a courtroom. Therefore, training standards and new methods for the use of force have evolved and been put into practice. The Use Of Force conundrum, the escalation of force models both teach officers to use less lethal tactics before resorting to more lethal means. Situations officers face are all unique and officer’s reactions are all different, no model can cover every situation. With that in mind, many police departments still enforce strict policies concerning the use of force to help reduce liability on the department if a brutality situation arises. Officers when facing a life or death scenario now must think about what the perception of the public would be if they use too much force and also the grave consequences if they do not control the situation. Now more than ever, police are using more sophisticated technology in controlling subjects and the scrutiny in doing so has increased. In particular, the use of Conducted Energy Devices (CED) has been a popular topic challenged by the media (Smith et al., 2009). The use

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