Quality Teaching Model Analysis

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The NSW Department of Education (DoE) has developed a Quality Teaching Framework (QTF) to assist in ensuring students experience quality learning whilst benefiting those of all abilities, regardless of cultural and linguistic differences. This paper will demonstrate the relationship between the QTF and those students with English as an additional language/dialect (EAL/D).

According to research on Quality Teaching by Killen (2009), there has been a continuous strive in refining teaching models to improve on the outcomes of student learning whilst providing teachers with sufficient techniques to ensure that there is effective and high quality teaching practices and quality learning environments. The Quality Teaching model presents pedagogy
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Taylor (1997) refers to the three major components of Vygotskys theory similarly, but rather describes the first two as: internalization of auxiliary culture means and the interpersonal or social process of mediation. ZPD appears in literature numerous times as being a very prominent component of Vygotsky’s theory specifically in Gibbons (2002) and Swan …show more content…
It closely relates to education. As cultural tools are not genetically inherited, education is prime in introducing children to cultural tools whilst developing new psychological qualities, as a consequence, translating to abilities of the child. Through others, such as teachers, who provide children with cultural tools for thinking and creating, it creates a space for them to ‘become’ themselves. Swan (2006) recognizes teachers, as one to deliver ‘scaffolding’ for learning and this is vital when considering how much interaction is needed for these resources to become internalised. Kozulin (1990) describes internalisation as a process where cultural artifacts, including language, take on a psychological function. Further to this point, the work of Light et. Al (1991) explains Vygotsky’s view of ‘Through others we become ourselves’ as a process of cultural development expressed in a logical form. Essentially, the author speaks of creating ‘personality’ from individual functions. This happens at an external and internal level. It is important to keep in mind now how ZPD works. VanPatten and William (2015) simply describe this component of Vygotsky’s theory as the difference between what an individual can do independently and what they are able to do with mediation such as adult guidance and assistance. The ZDP is vital when considering education as it demonstrates that children in

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