The Pros And Cons Of The Pharmaceutical Industry

1236 Words 5 Pages
Author Jonathan Safran Foer said in his 2009 book, Eating Animals, “It 's always possible to wake someone from sleep, but no amount of noise will wake someone who is pretending to be asleep” (53). He verbalizes what most are afraid to consider; the American medical programs are problematic, and the profiteers and distributors of drugs feign ignorance over the corruption of the industry. Unfortunately, these issues are deeply rooted in the history and practices of doctors and pharmaceutical companies. The United States healthcare system needs to be reformed because not only do the underinsured receive secondary treatment due to the Food and Drug Administration standards, but doctors pocket “gifts” from prescription drug companies and those with …show more content…
However, in this money reduction phenomenon is where the problem lies. Essentially, the entire pharmaceutical industry is motivated by greed and monetary values over the act of helping people with illnesses. According to the 2013 National Health Interview Survey, 8% of U.S citizens did not take their prescriptions in an attempt to save money (Report: Patients Forgo). Pharmaceutical companies are typically granted patents on their drugs for up to twenty years, during which they can be “exploited commercially” (Harvey 16+). After that, more affordable generic brands can be put on the market. Most people cannot afford the price of brand drugs, and in those cases the generic brands become a necessity. “…due to high prices set by pharmaceutical companies, few can afford the medicines they need (Harvey 16+).” This is where the largest problem is; this is where the most people suffer. Pharmaceutical companies often will, after the end of the initial twenty years, change a small aspect of the drug and remarket it under a new patent. Then the advertisements of this new drug are used to prevent doctors from prescribing the generic brand to patients (Appleby). Pharmaceutical companies argue that high prices for drugs are a necessity, due to research and development prices; that is the furthest from the truth as the public pays …show more content…
Doctors are way too eager to prescribe drugs to ease the mind and this has unimaginably detrimental results. Since 1928 and the invention of penicillin, one hundred antibiotic compounds have been used in modern medicine but innovation has been at a lull since 1987. Because no new compounds have been created, the trend of overprescribing psychotropic medicines to people with mental illness threatens to worsen the risk of bacterial and antibiotic resistance (Knapton). Still, doctors continue to prescribe excessive antidepressants and anxiety medicines while under pressure from companies. Several of these drugs have severe and often fatal consequences. Brennan McCartney and Candace Downing, eighteen and twelve, were both found hanging just days after being prescribed Cipralex and Zoloft while the trials for Cymbalta, now the fourth most prescribed drug in the United States, took four lives of participants. Furthermore, the list of disorders has grown to 312 in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders which includes caffeine withdrawal (Terrell 10+). Mental disorders are the only fields not entirely objective, so companies can lobby to have more disorders listed and doctors have more opportunities than ever to prescribe drugs. This leads to over diagnosis and over medication that the industry continues to

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