The Pros And Cons Of Contraception

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Arguably the leading cause of countless failed marriages, children born out of wedlock, and broken relationships, contraception has been a leading issue in the Church and the rest of the world for decades. It can be traced as far back as Margaret Sanger, a nurse in the early part of the 20th century, who was the editor of the Birth Control Review, and an activist for population control and “the purification of the race.” In order to consider fairly if contraception is moral, the effects and uses—both good and bad—must be considered, as well as the Church’s position, as it stands as Christ’s voice here on earth, and teaches with the same authority. Once that has been examined, one can make an informed decision as to what the proper response to this controversial issue should be, and what steps can be taken to spread this informed knowledge. There are two ways to use birth control, or the “pill”: the first as a medication that can be prescribed, and the second as initially intended—to prevent pregnancy. The first, used as a medication, the pill is prescribed to women who …show more content…
The increased levels of estrogen caused by the pill are polluting the water supply, causing dangerous environmental effects, such as the poisoning of various animal species. People are becoming aware of the dangerous side effects on women. Happily, the Church still stands as a beacon of light offering hope and certainty to those who are struggling to discover the true meaning of human sexuality. For, as Paul VI in Humane Vitae states “man cannot attain that true happiness for which he yearns with all the strength of his spirit, unless he keeps the laws which the Most High God engraved in his very nature…We implore from the God of all holiness and pity an abundance of heavenly grace as a pledge of which We gladly bestow Our apostolic

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