The Life Of Fredrick Douglass

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The Narrative of The Life of Fredrick Douglass effectively shows readers the hardships slaves had to live with on the road to freedom. From the faulty idea of a “romantic southern image” to the unfortunate slave-on-slave betrayal, Douglass debunks these ideas and blames them for the inability to improve the slave’s well-being and the societal ignorance regarding southern conditions. Several epiphanies, such as his new knowledge of the north and realization of slavery’s malice, motivated Douglass and filled his heart with determination to focus his train of thought towards freedom. Despite the many difficulties, he made it there.
Douglass rebukes the romantic image of slavery by using vivid imagery to describe the horrors of his everyday situations
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When Mr. Auld benightedly condemned Mrs. Auld 's attempts to teach Douglass how to read, Douglass passionately states, “I now understood what had been to me a most perplexing difficulty- to wit, the white man’s power to enslave a black man”(47). That moment was very influential to Douglass because he now understood what many of the other slaves were unable to recognize. This is the realization of the slave 's position in southern society, and that allowed Douglas to understand the pathway of slavery to freedom. His ability to learn that invaluable information without a real teacher is why Douglass both appreciated and disliked his master so much. When living on Mr. Freeland’s farm as a adult, Douglass was able to spread his knowledge and share his tools of growth when he says, “I agreed to do so, and accordingly devoted my Sundays to teaching these my loved fellow-slaves how to read” (87). His biblical teachings taught the slaves how to comprehend the word of God and he was praised for his generous instruction. Not only did Douglass’ literacy change his train of thought and expand his mind, but he now had the power to open the eyes of fellow slaves. None of this could have been possible without Douglass learning how to read, but despite that, his fellow slaves now had the opportunity to see the …show more content…
That system of slavery could not find change without the combined intellect and wit of slaves, which was condemned by the common tyrannical master. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass allowed Douglass to become a world symbol of the African American masses and their plight. The publication of this narrative across the nation opened the eyes of many Americans, significantly northerners, who did not know the ugly nature of “southern living”. The depiction of savage southern slavery further fueled the abolitionist movement throughout the nation. A new and massive wave of protest against the southern treatment of slaves linked the hearts of millions of Americans, improving the abolitionist cause which soon led to great

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