How Did Frederick Douglass Struggle For Freedom

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Frederick Douglass experienced many trials and tribulations throughout out his life both as a slave and as a freeman. Douglass was born and raised as a slave however, at a young age he was taught by Mrs. Auld how to spell, which give him the desire to learn and in time become his own master. Robert O’Meally identified Douglass as an America icon because Douglass represents the American idea, which is to make something of yourself and controlling your own destiny. Douglass started at the bottom of society as a slave, with no voice nor respect, but through hard work and determination to learn he grained a voice and power over his destiny. Douglass saw the potential and the power of literature on his life and knew that knowledge will be his key to escaping slavery and master his own destiny. He also understood that the slave masters knew that knowledge would be the downfall of slavery if their slaves were allowed to learn and this thought only encourage Douglass’ own desire to learn more. Douglass’s experience is iconic because he embodies the spirit of endurance and strength during the evils of …show more content…
Similar to how Douglass’ struggle for freedom represented the hope of freedom and the renewal of self confidence and inspiration to his fellow slaves, the same is apply to today’s Americans because even though slavery is no longer in America, oppression is still a force that is strong. Douglass’ struggle should also be a representation of the idea of never stop fighting for the good and equality of people. Frederick Douglass is an American icon as stated by Robert O’Meallly, because Douglass’ experiences and struggles represent hope, it reminds us that life will not get easier but if we are determined and have the desire to learn, then we can overcome the challenges of whatever we might

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