The Myths Of Slavery In The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass

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The Myths of Slavery Rewrite In the famous narrative, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass himself addresses the negativity and effects slavery. He elaborates this thought through the various terrors he experiences and explains throughout his life as a slave. Douglass’ main belief is that only through education can freedom for black society be obtained. Douglass’ determination to no longer live the life of an ignorant uneducated slave led to his conviction and utmost desire for liberation. With this, Douglass was given the opportunity to influence fellow slaves who shared his same goal for liberation and equality. Overall, Douglass’ influences upon fellow slaves led to the emphasis on controversial issues regarding the …show more content…
Unfavorable conditions, such as starvation and beating, symbolize the idea of romance between slaveholder and slave as the poor treatment portrays the downfall in their relationship. One image Douglass describes in particular is the memory of, “the cruel lashings to which these slaves were subjected” (21). As Douglass encountered many distinct slaveholders throughout his life as a slave, slaveholders would commonly torture their slaves without any provocation. One slaveholder specifically, by the name of Captain Auld, would tie up one of his younger female slaves, and whip her between four to five hours at a time, in Douglass’ memory, for no apparent reason. This tortured slave had no use of her hands, and had also never proven to be problematic. Ironically however, because she could not use her hands, he viewed her as useless and helpless regardless. Her helplessness left opportunity for Captain Auld, leading to her depiction as a lesser to her slaveholder.This portrayal of a helpless female slave relates to the false idea of a “romantic image of slavery” because even though she believed she completed her duties in the field, …show more content…
During this time, many white men carried the belief that they were overly responsible for the care of African civilization. This was because many of them felt either spiteful for how they slaves been treated or simply because blacks were labeled as property. The spiteful beliefs of whites was supported in that some whites felt they [blacks] were not capable to live for themselves. Although in some cases this was not true, they were mostly correct, because in reality, slaves were barely able to live under the conditions and rations at their various homes. Over time, slaves and Douglass alike began to turn to, “stealing, begging, or praying in order to survive…” (31). This attitude of preying upon others led whites becoming either furious and calling for their capture, or the attempt to help slaves learn how to become educated and integrate them into society. Douglass’ in his return to Mr. Freeland, met many slaves and persuaded them into sharing the desire of learning how to read. Douglass then went on to creating his own school, teaching slaves to read on Sundays. Douglass remembers one time when he, “had at one time over forty scholars...all ages...desiring to learn” (48). Every Sunday those slaves exhibited their intellectual capabilities by making the decision to learn rather than acting in the way their masters

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