The Mccarthy Era In The Crucible By Arthur Miller

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The McCarthy Era can be recognized as an influential time period to Arthur Miller’s The Crucible with connecting events and fearful societies. People believe that the results of the McCarthy Era were what Miller based parts of his book off of. The McCarthy Era began in 1950, an era of accusations made upon people who showed no evidence of being guilty of supporting communism. This time period was also tied into the Second Red Scare with political repression and campaigns spreading fear. Those accused of communism became subjects to aggressive court hearings, investigations, and questionings. The events which resulted in persecutions from the McCarthy Era left people thinking that the innocent losses from the Salem Witch trials in The Crucible …show more content…
Many people were accused of witchcraft without hard evidence, just like in the McCarthy Era, people were accused of communism with no way of proving it. People then needed someone to blame, so many started falsifying information upon others. “The sanctions imposed on thousands of schools teachers, longshoremen, film directors, union officials, civil servants,automobile workers, and house wives during the late 1940s and 1950s seriously violated those peoples constitutional rights. But at the time, most Americans believed that communists were soviet puppets who might subvert the government, steal official secrets, or sabotage defense plants…”. ( McCarthyism) This quote is significant in connecting to The Crucible because it refers to the claims on well known people in town that they believe violated their laws. Fear made many come to quick to make decisions on accusing people. In the book people are hesitant to point fingers at those they believe are guilty, and many who had not confessed were proven guilty. Similar to the Salem Witch Trials when there were false accusations made upon people, so people wouldn't be seen as guilty. John Proctor exclaims; “I speak my own sins; I cannot judge another. I have no tongue for it.” ( Miller 119-120). This is a significant factor to how one has morals and can speak up and represent themselves and have no heart to purposely hurt others,when the truth about the events …show more content…
“Friendly witnesses told stories about their experiences in the communist party and identified it’s memories, while unfriendly witnesses remained silent. Most of them would have been willing to talk about their own political activities, but they balked at describing those of others. However, because the Supreme Court did not protect people accused of communism, witnesses who did not want to name names had to rely on the fifth amendments privilege against self-incrimination and refuse to answer any question that might subject them to prosecution.” (McCarthyism). Not wanting to be a witness and tell about political parties was due to fear of possibly being persecuted and outcasted from the community. In The Crucible Giles Corey wouldn’t name names in court hearing due to his fear and the consequences that came with confession being made. So quick decisions were made to better himself not thinking about what would be best for the community. Those who spoke up knew nothing could protect them after telling the truth, so they hold on to the fact that they can refuse questions they didn’t want to answer. This being America was in panic about the circumstances they were under so many actions and confessions were questionable in court. Danforth says; "In an ordinary crime, how does one

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