Siddharth The Four Noble Truths

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Before the name Buddha comes into play he started off as Siddhartha Gautama. Buddhism itself to be a Dharma away a teaching and it's much less focused on the exterior it's not really monotheistic or polytheistic- they're not talking about gods or goddesses they're talking about you they're talking about what you cando to free yourself to find enlightenment of what they call Nirvana and we'll talk about that in a moment but we have the year at about 563 BCE and you have to remember that a lot of these stories are passed down they could be nonfiction they might some be fiction but they are legends that are believed by people who follow this faith and Sidharth the Gautama was born in Nepal, Nepal9 was in north-east India up there in the mountains …show more content…
head and now he figured it out he's enlightened and he's going to come up with four noble truths and the Four Noble Truths are key to Buddhism and the first one is dukkha and dukkha basically means that you understand that everything in life is basically craving and suffering that at the root of everything we're all suffering because we want Buddha said that the key to a happy life was wanting what you had and not wanting what you didn't have so that's the first noble truth is understanding dukkha and then the second one is understanding where that originates from that's some Maria and what that means is that you understand that suffering comes from you wanting stuff that nothing is permanent everything is non permanent so as soon as your I really want that gum I need that gum and you get the gum then the gum is gone and you want something else so what Buddha says is that in the second noble truth you have to understand that your suffering originates in your mind wanting stuff and desiring stuff so then the third noble truth is nirodha which means stopping the dukkha if you can stop the dukkha then you can create nirvana and that means once you've reached Nirvana you don't have to keep coming back to this miserable place because the idea iswhen you want something when you need something that creates karma and that karma is what keeps you trapped in this reincarnation cycle so that's the third noble truth is realizing that you have to stop all of this madness and the fourth noble truth is MA and mugham means that there is a pathway to doing this and this Eightfold pathway is the next thing we're going to look at which is the fourth noble truth and I'll give you a head it's not too hot it's not too cold it's just right so this is called the middle way that's why I said it's not too hot not too cold it's called the Eightfold Path or the middle way finding the right way through this life to reach nirvana enlightenment and like the Hindus they believe it's possible to

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