The Importance Of Early Phonics In Education

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According to the Department of Education, Science, and Training (2005, p. 36) more than 74% of the children entering first grade who are at risk for reading failure will continue to have reading problems into adulthood. This means teachers have the large task of ensuring each student possesses a solid foundation built up with a range of strategies in order for them to learn how to read. One way reading skills can be taught is through the use of early, explicit and systematic phonics. Teaching phonics is the process of showing students the relationships letters and sounds have and how to use that understanding in order to read and spell words (Tompkins, Campbell, Green, and Smith, 2015). Over time the understandings about teaching children …show more content…
In order for children to learn how to read, teachers must understand what phonics are, the methods they can be taught, the benefits of early phonics education and the importance they have in teaching reading …show more content…
According to Emmitt, Hornsby and Wilson (2006), if students do not progress further than spelling by sound, they will be stuck at an early age of spelling. Rose (2006) said that the benefits from early phonics education can still be seen as the child gets older, meaning that the experiences they have in their early education can improve their linguistic and cognitive development. A child’s phonemic awareness provides a strong predictor of what their reading achievement will be later in life (Tompkins et al., 2015). This evidence highlights the importance of children having an effective reading program early in their education, as it is a determiner of ability in later life. Teaching early phonics in the classroom allows for students who are struggling to read to be identified. This means that intervention and support can be implemented earlier which will in turn benefit the student’s reading both now and in the future (The Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills, 2010, p. 38). There are ranges of positive effects for children who have foundational phonics education, having this instruction is crucial for those students without strong literacy influences at home (Rose, 2006, p. 31). Synthetic phonics instruction is taught explicitly and is important for fixing the inequalities between students from different

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