Mental Health Stigmas

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result in a positive difference in the participant’s behavior. Another way that the stigmas on mental illness can be reduced is by using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).
ACT is supposed to promote change in someone’s response to mental illness and influence them to accept those diagnosed with illnesses (Kenny & Bizumic, 2016, p. 179). ACT seemed to be much like the Open Doors Program done by Gaebel, Baumann, and Phil (2003), discussed in their study on stigmas within mental illness. Both studies acknowledge the desire for distance from mental illness as well as the fear of people with mental illness. The only difference is Gaebel et al. (2003) focused on the point of view of the people with mental illnesses, whereas, Kenny and Bizumic
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One intervention focuses on limiting social distance desired in our society towards mental illness, and the other intervention is more of an information based tactic in order for people to see that those with mental illness can be “normal” and seemingly function. When used in conjunction with each other, these interventions will inform people about mental illness and begin to end the unnecessary fear of these illnesses and the people who are plagued by them. The two-prong approach is both innovated and cost-effective. The only thing needed is a researcher who is dedicated to the cause and has time to perform the interventions. Sadly, the study may not be time efficient, the studies could take anywhere from 2-4 hours and should probably be replicated through multiple universities as well as semesters. Researchers will also have to notify students that there will be a follow-up after the initial study to see if the results were conclusive to the hypothesis. This two-prong approach would most likely be the most effective way to reduce and discuss the stigmas surrounding mental …show more content…
People diagnosed with a mental illness should not feel isolated, scared, or worse about their condition because our society has not been properly exposed to mental illness or educated about it. People with mental illnesses are hard on themselves already; some of these people have a lot to cope with already, and society does not need to make matters worse. It is unfortunate that a vast majority of the population who have been diagnosed with a mental illness are going untreated because of the negative attitudes of the society (Link, Phelan, Bresnahan, Stueve, & Pescosolido, 1999, p. 1328). It takes courage to realize that you have a problem and to be willing to go and get help; these people do not need to feel embarrassed or discouraged from seeking the assistance that they need because of the negativity that surrounds them. Recoveries will not be made if people are avoiding treatment (Yanos et al., 2015, p. 172). These interventions when combined are inexpensive, easy to conduct, and also proven to be useful. It would help a great number of those in our communities if changes were conducted and people were better informed. If society is better trained using these intervention methods, more people will see that mental illness is nothing to be afraid of and instead something that needs to be supported. As a result, stigmatization will be reduced, and the world will become a better place

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