The Importance Of School Reform

709 Words 3 Pages
Overall, Ravitch presents several strong points in regards to the current school reforms. First, the market is not the best way to deliver public services. Ravitch states that business leaders like the idea of modeling schools similar to the market, however structuring schools so that they function like a business destroys communities and replaces them with consumers (Ravitch, 2011, p. 221). New York City offers an example of why the business model does not work in the school system. Businessman Michael Bloomberg was elected mayor of New York City in 2001. During his tenure, Bloomberg restructured New York’s school system into a corporate model. Consequently, all decisions were made by the city’s Department of Education with close supervision …show more content…
Gates, Walton, and Broad, known as the Billionaire Boys’ Club, are private organizations that make large investments in education reform. Thus, Gates, Walton and Broad foundations have a significant influence on American education. Recipients of their investments are careful to align their reforms with the personal agendas of these private foundations and are careful not to criticize their educational policies. Therefore, if these recipients are not in agreement with these foundations, then they may lose future contributions. Ravitch argues there is a problem with private sectors exercising executive control over education; these organizations are not required to be under public review like public agencies. Furthermore, these foundations demand accountability from public schools on their performance, but have no accountability on their participation; if their plans fail, there is no system in place to hold them accountable. Thus, Ravitch warns public officials against allowing private organizations to control public policy; especially when officials don’t have complete understanding of the implementation behind the private sectors’ agenda (Ravitch, 2011, p. …show more content…
Ravitch presents evidence of how a solid curriculum can influence student achievement. Massachusetts is one of few states with a strong curriculum in every subject. Students in this state have the highest academic performance in the nation on the NAEP and rank near the top when compared to their peers in other nations (Ravitch, 2011, p. 237). Ravitch argues that we lack educational vision, and that ignorance is not caused by the school’s structural organization, but from the lack of coherent educational standards (Ravitch, 2011, p. 225). Moreover, schools are limited in their curriculum because so much time is given to test preparation because of the prominence of high-stakes

Related Documents