Australian Pride

800 Words 4 Pages
Australian Pride

Australia being a nation of wealth and prosperity, that dignifies itself on its “Aussie pride” rather than human rights is the main reason as to why we haven 't secured a seat at the United Nations human rights council (UNHRC). While Australia is commendable for some of its approaches to HR, they continue to face issues with their harsh mandatory detention and turn back policy as well as over representation of indigenous people in the criminal justice system. Additionally, Australia continues to struggle to find a balance between national security and HR, thus causing difficulties to maintain the unbiased and democratic ideals of our multicultural country.

The problem with Australia is that issues are recognised and talked
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According to Amnesty, in 2015 Australia was one of 30 countries to illegally send refugees back to countries where they were unsafe and thus failed to comply with the international refugee law. It makes you wonder what the true meaning of HR is when certain people are prioritised over others. The current government is still choosing to send children to Nauru and Manus Island, despite having knowledge of harsh living conditions, abuse, risk of self harm and attempted suicide. Unfortunately, this isn’t much of an improvement from the previously unsuccessful “pacific solution” regarding the Tampa crisis.

Furthermore, our failures towards indigenous rights only means that Australia maybe considered unsuitable for a role in the UNHRC. Their severe overrepresentation in prisons is becoming shameful, with 10-17 year olds making up half of the Australians in detention, yet only 6% of the population. Horribly, despite international standard being 12 years old, Australia still holds children ages 10 and 11 in
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Essentially, an urgent change in mentality is needed if Australia wishes to successfully implement its HR towards Aboriginals as despite recommendations made by the UN, at least five indigenous people died in custody during 2015. However, we have high hopes of the recent “close the gap” campaign to improve issues with the health and life expectancy gaps.

Also, It’s well known that HR is for everyone, however, Australia’s counter terrorism laws are proving otherwise. To be truthful, such laws may have potential to protect Australians from security threats. However, Doctor Muhammad Haneef’s case demonstrates that laws can be used at the expense of other fundamental HR, like equality before the law, and the right to be presumed innocent from

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