The Importance Of Jesuit Motivation

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Motivation, as the energy necessary to take any assignment and follow it through successfully, is a byproduct of a fully functioning person who is open to experience, lives existentially (in a fluid way, in basically a congruent continual state), and is capable of establishing empathic relations with other human beings (Rogers, 1963, 1977). When empathy is absent from one’s life, and when there are no signs of relationships of unconditional positive regard, then there should be reason to believe that the motivational level of the person will be low. Viktor Frankl (1996) maintains that motivation is a function of goals and purposes that are valued by a person. For his logotherapeutic concept of motivation, one needs goals and purposes for the …show more content…
Jesuit leadership strategies are part of the implicit basis of the Magister Institute’s leadership repertoire. According to Lowney (2003), since the time of Ignatius of Loyola, the Jesuits have developed and honed a style of leadership based on four strategies. These governing principles and interpersonal philosophy were part of the essence of the Jesuit way of life and Ignatian spirituality and were expected of each one of the Jesuits in their relations with the world at large, and were also to be used for the education and management of the Jesuits themselves. Self-awareness, ingenuity, love, and heroism are the four charged words best describing this Jesuit leadership managerial style. The Jesuits are trained continuously to know and understand themselves, to check on their weaknesses and strengths in their daily meditative practices, and, again, more intensively during special prolonged introspective time periods yearly. The Jesuits also undergo a deep self evaluation twice in their lifetimes (Lowney, …show more content…
The former Jesuits emphasized discernment, prayer, preferential option for the poor, and produced a model of government very similar to the one of Comunidad de Vida Cristiana. They both had a coordinator, an Executive Committee, and were supposed to be intrinsically apostolic communities. They both believed in the spiritual exercises of Ignatius of Loyola as the brain and heart center of their spiritual, social, and personal lives. The way the Society of Jesus understands and extends the interpretation of the spiritual exercises is the norm for the group’s understanding and interpretation. The association with the Jesuits was slowly transformed into a sort of accompaniment in the sense that Goizueta (1995) understood it. Goizueta is the only son of a very rich Cuban American who studied theology against his father’s will and became the President of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States (1990-1991) and President of the Catholic Theological Society of America (2004-2005). Today, Dr. Roberto Goizueta teaches systematic theology at Boston College, a well known Jesuit College (Magister

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