Indigenous Reflective Essay

Great Essays
1.a) Please document your feeling on commencement of this unit, and at the conclusion of this unit.
Reflections should include:
· What are your expectations about the unit before starting?
Prior to the commencement of this unit I expect to learn more about Indigenous culture and the hardships they faced due to European settlement. I am hoping to find out how life was like before the European settlement and how the settlement effected not only Indigenous people but also their land. Incompletion of this unit I would like to know if some of aspects of Indigenous culture was taken and blended to the main stream Australian culture we have today. Incompletion of this unit I hope to know more about the stolen generation, the reasons why they were
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As it would appeal to this Indigenous man. Allowing him to be notified of which of his cultural foods to eat and which ones to avoid in order for him to lower and maintain his diabetes. The introduction of this particular diet would hopefully encourage this to eat healthy, as the diet caters to his specific needs. Through this diet this Indigenous man is able to keep consuming his cultural foods instead of being told to eat other foods.

This diet would eliminate the indigenous man from feeling that the ‘white man’ is saying that the Indigenous cultural food is unhealthy. If for example this man was given a list of ‘healthy food’ and none of the food in that list was Indigenous, the patient may feel that yet again his culture is being targeted and attacked as not one food item in the ‘healthy’ list was indigenous. This could lead to the patient distrusting the practitioner and negatively impact the way he views health services.

However if this diet is introduced it creates bond between this patient and the hospital as it will allow him to know that the hospital is working with him and wants the best for him. This diet is also more realistic as the patient is able to still consume familiar foods while controlling his

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