The Importance Of Globalization In Indonesia

1681 Words 7 Pages
Globalization is a widely controversial phenomenon throughout the world. People argue over whether or not globalization is one of the greatest forces working against poverty, or if globalization only leads to greater exploitation of workers in the developing world. By simply looking at the tags on various clothing items, it is evident that the majority of textiles is produced overseas in developing countries, thus showing the significance of globalization. Large corporations have begun to alienate themselves from the production process and now get their products from foreign textile enterprises. Corporations get high quality products at low prices, allowing them to maximize production and profits. Textile enterprises also benefit due to the …show more content…
Indonesia boasts fair and free presidential elections, allowing all adults aged seventeen and older to vote, with a few minor exceptions (police or active military members, convicts serving terms of five years or greater, and people suffering from mental disabilities). Indonesia is ruled by a constitution which lays the groundwork for the country’s government. In the constitution specific human rights are outlined, but in action, it turns out that oftentimes human rights are not enforced. All citizens have the right of freedom from torture and cruel punishment, however, torture, excessive force, and unjustified killings are acts often committed by the military and police. Citizens are provided freedom of speech, except when it slanders another religion or advocates separatism. Indonesians are granted the right to assemble as long as they notify the police with a written statement three days before the planned demonstration and have been issued a receipt from the police, an act that many law enforcers refuse to do. Civilians are granted rights to choose and practice whichever …show more content…
It is crucial that workers are treated fairly and humanely in order for the benefits of globalization to be shared universally. In Indonesia, the Labor Ministry, a government institution, is responsible for enforcing all standards, such as wages, hours, and working conditions, and implementing penalties when these standards are violated (“Indonesia Human Rights”, 2015). Each province of Indonesia has their own minimum wage, which is based on the amount deemed appropriate for the workers to live decently. The minimum monthly wage in Jakarta, for example, is 3.1 million IDR (Indonesian Rupiah) per month, which converts to about $231 US dollars (“Indonesia Minimum Monthly Wages, 2016). To put this into perspective, a minimum wage worker in Kansas will make $1,224 US dollars per month. It is imperative to add that the minimum wage does not apply in all sectors, and that some sectors, such as small enterprises, labor industries, and informal companies (those not taxed or monitored by the government), are exempt from these rules. The law states that the typical work week should include forty hours of work with a half hour break for each four hours of work, and one full day of rest each week, with a large emphasis on the prohibition of excessive overtime. Again, much like the minimum wage, there are sectors where these rulings do not apply. The U.S. Department of State claims that

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