The Importance Of Chinese Culture In Amy Tan's Joy Luck Club

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There is no doubt that everyone wants to accomplish the American dream; however, it can never be attained unless one is willing to sacrifice and suffer. In fact, many new immigrants selflessly make many sacrifices so that their children may have an opportunity to realize this feat. In Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club, Tan demonstrates how four Chinese mothers immigrate to America in hope for a better future. While they are able to enjoy the freedom that they could not find in China, they are not able to establish a good relationship with their daughters due to their differences in values and expectations. Through this novel, it is evident that adhering to restrictive Chinese culture while living in America has an impact on the relationships between …show more content…
For example, Chinese relies on superstition because they do not have a proper education so they just believe the things which is actually having no sense. In The Joy Luck Club, June’s mother, “move the larger pieces: the sofa, chairs, end tables, a Chinese scroll of goldfish… ‘When something goes against your nature, you are not in balance.’”(Tan, 109). Accordingly, Chinese people don’t have a proper education. Their way to find out the truth is to believe superstitious. For those well-educated American, they think Chinese superstitious is ridiculous, especially for the June to see her mother move the furniture everywhere around because she think she is against the nature. Moreover, the American daughter’s stereotype of superstition hinder the relationship between herself and her mother. The research shows, “In 1975, Deng Xiaoping reported that university graduates were ‘not even capable of reading a book’ in their own fields after graduation” (Mike, education). In addition, a lot of Chinese people does not have proper education when they were young, so they clearly understand the feeling being unknowledgeable. So they don’t want to let their children been look down to be an unknowledgeable person. As a result, In China, mothers are strict to their children, but their rigour to their children are all good for them. In The Joy Luck Club, when June’s mother told her to practice piano and she refused it, her mother shouted, “Those who are obedient and those who follow their own mind! Only one kind of daughter can live in this house. Obedient daughter!” (Tan, 153). June’s mother’s intention was good for her daughter because she want her daughter to be talented, and smart, but the way she use to educate is too harsh that her daughter cannot expect. Chinese mother will force their children to do things because they know

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