The Importance Of Chaos In Macbeth

867 Words 4 Pages
Many elements build up a play to be that of one of a tragedy. Shakespeare’s Macbeth was one of his greatest plays, in fact it is his most popular tragedy even though it is also his shortest of its kind. At the beginning of the play the witches mention an ongoing war. After King Duncan’s death, nature is seen reflecting the subjects’ mood. Later, no one is pleased with Macbeth’s reign of terror, his subjects complain and the witches are seen planning his fall. It is also seen that Lady Macbeth mentally suffers and sleep walks. The play Macbeth meets the criteria of a tragedy and this results from chaos established through setting and conflict, the influence of supernatural elements on Macbeth as well as elements of nature reflecting the mood …show more content…
When the witches first plan to meet Macbeth “When the hurlyburly is done” and “When the battle’s lost and won” (Shakespeare 1.1.3-4). Chaos is established at the beginning through the setting of on going events, from the witches’ reference. In addition, there is a lack of order in the battle where the people oppose the king through turmoil. Chaos is also manifested through people’s internal conflicts and guilt, where the character exhibits actions that are out of the ordinary. The doctor is astonished by Lady Macbeth’s sleep walk routine because she is able “to receive at once the/ benefit of sleep and do the effects of watching” and thinks that it is “a great perturbation in nature” (5.1.8-9). Lady Macbeth’s internal conflicts and guilt of her actions, as a result, causes her to walk, talk and do actions all while in her sleep. For her to receive the benefits of sleep, as in rest, and to also do actions of being awake is paradoxal because this goes against the regular nature of sleep and how it typically takes …show more content…
The witches plan to lead Macbeth to his downfall by using their magic, so that “He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear/ His hopes above wisdom, grace, and fear” (3.5.30-31). The witches trick Macbeth and build in him the illusion that he will not be killed and raise his hopes up so high that they will later only come crashing down. As a result, his high hopes and confidence cloud his mind and judgement, even when later he is being cornered he does not attempt an escape hence he is killed by Macduff. After Duncan’s murder, elements of nature reflect his tragic death, which makes “Hours dreadful and things strange” and “this [a] sore night/…trifl[ing] former knowings” (2.4.3-4). As a result of Macbeth’s actions, nature reflects its sorrow towards this event, this results in it being different than usual thus having a great deal of disorder within its elements. Similarly, the nature of time is personified to having feelings of sadness and pain, which clearly also reflect people’s mood on Duncan’s

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