Teacher Autonomy In Education

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Huitt (2013) states that the changes in society have not only changed human activity but also children and how they learn, the introduction of a ‘global society’ has made interaction more dynamic and it has left parents, educators and the government concerned as to how they should prepare children for a successful adulthood. Autonomy is an important factor in a place of learning as it allows the educator control over their decisions and methods of teaching (Samuels, 1970). Lawson (2004) continues the discussion saying, teacher autonomy is an important factor in recruiting and retaining good quality educators. Policy changes in the curriculum are believed by some to have limited the amount of autonomy held by the teachers by telling them what …show more content…
Autonomy is affected by macro influences who put policies and practices into place that limit the amount of creativity a teacher is able to use, such as the national curriculum and standardised assessment, both with the intention of improving academic performance of students. However, Wenglinsky (2002) says the social backgrounds of students have a big influence on their ability to learn, and therefore teacher autonomy would benefit the students on a micro level, however the macro influences are withholding that freedom to teach, effecting the miso environment as a whole. Good teacher autonomy is recognised as a way of improving engagement with pupils and helps develop more willing educators, rather than creating a setting where the teacher is forcing information upon the pupils, creating a collaborative effort within the miso setting (Lawson, 2007). This increase in macro control over the education system is down to the marketization of education and the increasing interest in the schools performance through league tables in order to highlight which schools are the best for your child to attend. However, the continued need to …show more content…
It is however, highlighted that though it is not clear on the full effects morale has on performance, it makes sense to assume that high levels of morale means high performance (Johnsrud, Heck & Rosser, 2000). Teacher morale effects many areas of a teacher’s performance, and there are many reasons why morale may be low, Evans (1998) found that many teachers are concerned with the running of their school. If an educator feels that those above them such as the governors or head-teacher is not motivated to perform and help to develop the pupils learning, they may become un-motivated themselves, meaning job satisfaction drops. Little or no positive feedback from the head as well as poor leadership and/or organisation are all factors which damage a teachers morale, this is then relayed onto the students they teach. Evans study found that if the head-teacher were motivated and interested in the miso settings within the school, there was an improved level of positivity, with the educators motivating each other too (1998). Morale helps encourage professional, energetic and motivated teachers. Since the Education Reform Act in 1988, it has been reported that teachers have become demoralised due to low pay and low social status (Evans, 1992). Anderson (1953) states that throughout history teachers have been prepared to leave

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