Social Model Of Disability Study

Amazing Essays
Warnock was striving to achieve a social model of disability which recognises that the limiting factor for disabled people in achieving their potential is being included effectively, rather than their inability to fit into pre-existing structures (Cole, 2008). Linked to this is the ever more widely held view that the provision, in all areas of society, received by disabled people should be based upon legislation that governs human rights (Hodkinson and Vickerman, 2009). The rights-based model of disability aims to empower disabled people and hold public institutions and structures accountable for implementing provisions of sufficient quality and in sufficient quantity to meet their human-rights responsibility (Handicap International, 2014). …show more content…
Whilst the moral argument in favour of a rights-based model is widely accepted it has received criticism for being a naïve ideology as not all schools have the ability in reality to provide a good education for all learners within the boundaries of current education systems (Farrell, 2001). Furthermore, it fails to consider the human right to education of the children whose lesson may be disrupted by a child with social, emotional or behavioural needs (Liasidou, 2012).
Research notes that inclusion has improved following the shift in legislation to reflect a social model of disability and the human rights agenda (Shakespeare and Watson, 2001). However, there still remains criticism relating to a number of key issues. Despite providing statutory guidance on inclusion to support the objectives identified in the first SEN code of practice (DFE, 2001) the underpinning legislation continued
…show more content…
New legislation enacted in the past year reflects a biopsychosocial model of disability recognising the biological, psychological and social factors as equally important considerations in supporting learners to achieve their full potential. The Children and Families Act was introduced to supercede all prior legislation and reform the entire approach to provision for SEND learners (DfE, 2014b). The Act underpins the statutory guidance for schools set out in The Special Educational Needs (SEN) Code of Practice (CoP): for zero to twenty-five years (DfE, 2014b). The duty for provision now starts from birth as there is strong evidence to support the importance of early intervention programmes particularly in counteracting the effects of socio-economic disadvantage (OFSTED, 2013). Furthermore, the learners within the ARMS provision will now benefit from support into adulthood. This is important because it has been noted that young people who experience socio-economic disadvantage are more likely to face significant barriers to fulfilling their potential and playing a full part in society (DWP, 2013). It is possible that their aspirations could decline as their understanding of the world grows and their perceptions of what they can achieve reflects this (Gutman and Akerman, 2008). By developing post-16 support it is hoped that as young people with SEND

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    From not including these children and branding them with labels to engaging them in mainstream education, inclusive education for children with SEN has been fluctuated. Despite the two acts and report having an impact, there have been heavy criticisms, especially with categorising and segregating children depending on their needs. However, each has contributed to the development of inclusive education though arguably, it could be improved. The notion on whether all children should be able to attend mainstream education has raised serious debates, with claims that special schools whilst others argued that differences in mainstream education is best. Evidence from previous years has shown that children with SEN are still struggling with reaching the attainment set by the national curriculum, despite changing and development of new legislations.…

    • 715 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As cognitive skills mature, the adolescent becomes more familiar to the adulthood life and can now make decisions that can benefit their child as well as themselves to keep going forward no matter what society has to say. However, being still an adolescent, the teen mother can occasionally still show signs of immature behavior from time to time. Once the adolescent grows into maturity after time, they have developed crystalized intelligence. This is intelligence gained from learning and experience in which can be used to make better decisions along a person’s life. Overall, pregnancy can affect a teenagers developing stage by forcing them to “grow-up” and make important decisions not only for them, but for their child.…

    • 1397 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Importance of Preschool Programs The priority of preschool programs has become a national concern due to the establishments of public prekindergarten programs throughout all the states. The introduction of structured learning environments is the new focus of prekindergarten programs. The connections between early childhood programs and kindergarten programs are key elements in helping bridge the transition gap (Skouteris, Watson, & Lum, 2012). Parents sometimes only have vague ideas of what school readiness really is and how to promote it (Belfield, & Garcia, 2014). With or without parental involvement preschool provides have the potential to replace or complement school readiness (Belfield, & Garcia, 2014).…

    • 1015 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Social Psychology

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Hodges, October 25, 2016). This is because parents have a greater impact on a child’s social influence than most think. Social influence takes place when one’s emotions or behaviors are affected by others (Myers, 2014). When a child is going through puberty there are many social changes that can cause self-esteem issues. Therefore, it is important for parents to show affection and support during childhood.…

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Social Disparity Theory

    • 1294 Words
    • 6 Pages

    While this approach to human rights showcases how human rights is relevant to social work practice, this system is also problematic which can make the practice of these three generations confusing. (Androff 2015, p. 32). Androff also argues that while the second generation rights are seen as positive rights which requiring funding in order to be provided; the funds necessary for the first-generation rights are ignored such as a functioning legal system (2015, p. 33). With this model focusing on the legal side, the need for a human rights based approach is there to move human rights passed being a political…

    • 1294 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This step is considered the team 's best-estimate approach for what the student can accomplish in one year. The measurable statement for student 's academic and performance goals must: “(1) Meet the student 's needs related to the disability that may interfere with his or her involvement and progress in the general education curriculum, (2) meet the student 's additional educational needs resulting from the disability, and (3) be measurable" (Gibb & Dyches, 2016, p. 59). Measurable implies the student 's behavior affirmed in the goal can be observed and measured to conclude when it has achieved. The IEP team sets goals important to the students and families. Gibbs and Dyches (2016) list the IEP team members as parents, regular classroom teacher, special education teacher, related service providers, an individual who can interpret evaluation results, a local education agency (LEA) representative, other individuals with specialized knowledge or expertise, and the student.…

    • 1680 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Social Model Of Disability

    • 1423 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In addition, underestimation inside of the education framework adversely effects on disabled individuals' chance for generously compensated job or training chance with advance education in grown-up life (Barton, (2013). People with impedances need equivalent access to the same learning prospect as those people who don't have…

    • 1423 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Standardized testing has taken many blows from critics because of its inadequacies. However, few stop to consider how the shortcomings of the tests and curriculum affect the students subjected to them. According to the U.S. government, 49.5% of adolescents in 2010 met the criteria for various mental health disorders (“Prevalence”). With an education system so focused on success and a country full of opportunities, why are the country 's youth foundering? Criticisms of standardized testing include its inability to effectively evaluate student and teacher performances and creating a curriculum that encourages information regurgitation in place of critical thinking, but few critics recognize its effects on the mental health of students.…

    • 1957 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As soon as students miss out on the small objectives in their younger years, the more pieces they will have to figure out when they are older. The more experienced and focus a student gets from his younger education, the more they will be driven to strongly impact the world. These students are our future, and if school uniforms can decrease the rates of bad experiences, and increase a more spirited school environment, then they might as well be incorporated. These younger students hold the key to our future and the use of school uniforms can influence these students into becoming stronger key…

    • 852 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In Cathy Davidson’s article, Project Classroom Makeover, one can easily see how biased and unrealistic the majority of her ideas and opinions are towards creating a new education paradigm. She has many valid points, but the amount of holes in her plans outweighs the benefits. What Davidson wants is an education to be interesting, while providing children with a successful start to life. While her intentions are possible, she is hoping for the wrong things to be changed in order for her scenario to work. Cathy Davidson strongly believes that standardization is inhibiting the ability for students to show their true potential outside of what is deemed important by the school.…

    • 1676 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays