The Social Model And The Medical Model Of Disability

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The model of disability proposed by the ICF is complex and dynamic. It is debated day-in and day-out in the 21st century. There are two models that are linked to people with disabilities today in Ireland. These are the Social model and the Medical model. These two models are working in conjunction with each other. Many people disregard the medical model and it is understandable, however different disabilities have different needs therefore the medical model can’t just be disregarded. The medical model needs to be involved in a person with disability’s life for example; if someone was to get depression, you would need anti-depressants as well as counselling. These sources of help are given by the medical model. However if someone was a wheelchair …show more content…
You need to focus on the persons surrounding’s instead of the persons disability, “By person-centered care I refer specifically to becoming familiar with the patient’s personal situation in its crucial re-lationship to the source of illness.”, (Caring for Patients: A Critique of the Medical Model, Allen B. Barbour, November 30th 1995, p.1512). These models may be seen as disempowering, and as reinforcing rather than challenging social exclusion.
The Medical Model of Disability
The medical model is also known as a socio-political model. Sometimes, people like policy makers and managers think about disability in this individual way they are most likely going to concentrate their efforts on ‘compensating’ people with impairments for what is not right with their bodies by, for example, targeting ‘special’ benefits at them and providing segregated ‘special’ services for them. They tend to believe that ‘curing’ or at least managing the disability completely revolves around figuring out the illness or disability from an in-depth clinical perspective.
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This model has been discussed and re-discussed by disabled people and they have come to the conclusion that it is the way that society is organised that causes the most problems for them rather than their disability. In its extreme form, the British social model denies the existence of impairment in the individuals concerned, and it has been criticised for failing to encompass the personal experience of pain and limitation that is often a part of impairment. “In addition, it should not be forgotten that some impairments are invisible but may have functional impacts and implications for personal identity and psychological well-being”, (Shakespeare and Watson, 2001). Often this model looks at ways of improving society by removing barriers and also removing the stigma attached to someone with a disability or impairment. When barriers are removed this gives disabled people the independence that they are entitled to as a citizen, due to the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission Act 2014. If all barriers were removed a disabled person could live independently as a human being and also be equal in society. There are also other barriers in society not just physical barriers, for example; people’s attitudes towards disabled people play a big part in the social model as this also disables people from having equal opportunities to be part of society. Abberley (1987) says that, “impairment often has social causes -

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