African American Incarceration

Great Essays
There has been subtle change in how the modern-day justice system has reformed historically throughout America. Initially, African Americans were enslaved and taken from their homes to work for white man’s financial profitability since the birth of this nation. Many were kidnapped from their homes in Africa and forced on lengthy voyages to tend for laborious tasks on American white men 's plantations. They were racially ridiculed and were deemed as inferior. Even though the civil war concluded in the emancipation of African American enslaved individuals, they still experienced retaliation that claimed the lives, socially, physical, mentally and even emotionally, of their loved ones continuously within American society. Through the ratification …show more content…
Regardless of such efforts, discriminatory traces still are apparent within mass incarceration, particularly of African American men in modern times. Unsurprising, they are still exploited by large institutions, such as corporations, as a punishment for their ‘choices’. Due to incarceration and felony charges, Black Americans are stripped from rights such as voting – a crucial aspect of citizenship. In regards to this social injustice, it is important to understand the connection between the Pre-Construction Era and modern day circumstances and how mass incarceration is deep-rooted within racial ideology in the United States to promote .
To begin with, knowing the historical context of this situation is very relevant in understanding how to combat this dilemma. The historical perspective of mass incarceration provides an insight of the primitive racially radicalized ideology that
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These Jim Crow laws were implemented to restrain African American men from practicing their rights as citizens- making them as second class citizens. Jim Crow laws became the new norm to restrain African Americans since lynching emanated as too aggressive. It was a passive aggressive method that was tolerated and became a settlement for an “equal” treatment between white and African Americans. Eugene Lawrence’s article, “Ku Klux Klan Conspiracy”, details on how the Ku Klux Klan played a huge role in the reinforcing the Jim Crow laws to restrain African Americans in society. Insuring that political campaigns swayed in their favor, the Ku Klux Klan devised several violent methods to target and terrorize affluent Black political leaders to fulfill their white supremacist agenda. Because of this high retaliation held against the Southern Black Americans, they refrained from becoming politically active. Therefore, this gave a leeway for White Americans to continue to have control of the local, state and to the national level of federal government. Philip Randolph and Chandler’s “Migration and Political power” expresses how African American used their political power combat South’s aggressiveness. Black Americans left the Southern States to the North where they faced less retaliation from voting and joined the American military as to symbolize

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