The Holocaust Retence, By Elie Wiesel's 'Night'

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Holocaust Essay The book Night is a book written by Elie Wiesel and it tells his story of his struggles that he went through while enduring the Holocaust. The book “HOLOCAUST BIOGRAPHIES: ELIE WIESEL Spokesman for Remembrance” is a biography written by Dr. Linda Bayer that is about Eliezer’s life during and after the Holocaust. The Holocaust was a period in history when millions of Jews were placed in concentration camps and later slaughtered in many barbaric ways. The ways that people got sent to these camps is if they were prisoners of war, if they were mentally disabled, and if they were Jewish. Elie Wiesel was sent to was Auschwitz, one of the most ruthless camps, because he was Jewish. While in these camps, he witnessed many people …show more content…
While Elie was in the camp, he observed a substantial amount of brutality. He had oversaw his dad get beat, starved, and robbed. He also felt the weight of having to survive and help his father on top of that. Many other people did go through the Holocaust as well, but after being in the concentration camps for a short period of time, those same people ended up killing their fathers in order to survive. But while Elie was in the camp with his dad, he helped him stay alive. He did think that his dad was a burden that he was caring around, but he still helped his only family member. When Elie was in Auschwitz his dad got deathly ill and he was told “Listen to me, kid. Don’t forget that you are in a concentration camp. In this place, it is every man for himself, and you cannot think of others. Not even your father. In this place, there is no such thing as father, brother, friend. Each of us lives and dies alone. Let me give your good advice: stop giving your ration of bread and soup to your old father… You cannot help him anymore. And you are hurting yourself. In fact you …show more content…
The fight did not end after the Holocaust; it only got worse. “Wiesel explained in All Rivers Run to the Sea that although the survivors felt greatly relieved to be safe at last, they ‘were not happy’ and wondered whether they would ever feel joy again. The reign of terror had ended, but for many-like Elie- liberation came too late. He was an orphan, alone in the world, searching for relatives and a place to go.” (ELIE WIESEL Spokesman for Remembrance, Dr. Linda Bayer, 62) After the Holocaust, Elie had a battle to face to live without his parents and for the longest time, he believed that he was the only one left from his family. When the Holocaust ended, someone made a book in order to keep track of all the Jewish people that were saved and Elie looked in that book, “Lists were circulated with names of people who had survived, but Elie didn’t find either of his big sisters’ names on these papers.” (ELIE WIESEL Spokesman for Remembrance, Dr. Linda Bayer, 62,) but one day he did find out what happened to his sisters, one of his sisters did survive the Holocaust as well, “One day, the headmaster of the school told Elie there the next day. Elie was shocked but hopeful. Could his sister have survived? Which sister?” When Elie found out that one of his sisters had survived, he was sent to

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