The Holocaust: Great Disasters And Reforms

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The Holocaust is one of the most powerful words in history. It represents a time where millions of innocent, ordinary people, family members, children, and more were killed simply for the fact that they were Jewish. In the book, “The Holocaust: Great Disasters, Reforms, and Ramifications”, the rise and fall of Hitler and the Third Reich is described in great detail. The author was Judy L. Hasday, beside from a short introductory essay by Jill McCaffrey, who was born in Pennsylvania, and throughout her career has written about devastating periods in history like the Holocaust, Columbine, and Apollo 13. Her goal in writing these books is to educate the American people, and knowledge is power. The book chronicled Hitler’s life from him being …show more content…
The mere thought of someone trying to wipe out a whole race is beyond belief, and it only takes one person to make a change. Hitler had a dream and he was able to make it a reality somehow, and now it is up to the human race to not let something like this ever happen again. We cannot repeat any of these abominations that were done during this time period, and that is what this book is trying to do. Judy L. Hasday is trying to educate the people, so we don’t follow in Hitler’s footsteps in the future. The Germans tried to cover up what they had done by burning down some of the concentration camps and historical documents because they knew what they had done was terrible, but they felt no remorse. Documenting what happened during this time period is all we can do to try and prevent genocide like this and Hasday is not the only author who has chosen to bring back the memories of this time. Given this is an important novel; there are many other holocaust books you can find with basically the same information. This is why it was nice that Hasday threw in a curveball here and there to make it …show more content…
Subjects of war and devastating attacks can always make for interesting topics. Hasday included many quotes from people who had seen the horrors of the holocaust up close. Some of the men described what they had seen at concentration camps, like a man named Reuben who watched countless people die every day at a labor camp. I would personally not recommend this book to anyone, not because it wasn’t a good book, but because they’re are better stories that you can read about the holocaust. I though this book was going to be a couple short stories describing what a few people went through during the holocaust, but it was mainly about what led up to the holocaust and what was going on during that time in Germany. A book I would recommend, about the holocaust is “Night” by Elie Wiesel. Wiesel first hand tells us what he saw through his own eyes at a concentration camp, where as Hasday did not go through that. The Holocaust was responsible for the death of millions of Jews, and to many people, the people killed were family. The most disrespectful thing one could do to the victims of the holocaust is to forget of this tragedy. Humans need to realize the power that one man can have over the world. The world needs to prevent disasters like this from becoming reality in the future, which is possible if people keep on educating themselves. One must remember to never forget Knowledge is

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