The Divine Command Theory: Morality Is Ultimately Based On The Commands Of God

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My purpose in this essay is to explain and analyze the Divine Command Theory. Divine Command Theory states that morality is ultimately based on the commands of God. I agree with Divine Command Theory because I believe in God and that he is the creator of all things. Therefore, since he is the most powerful thing imaginable, he has the right to make actions right or wrong by command.
Divine command theory is the idea that certain actions are morally good or morally bad because they are what God wills for us. God’s demands determine what is right or wrong. What he tells us to do is right, and what he tells us not to do is wrong. This theory states that the only thing that makes an act morally wrong is that God forbids doing it, which implies
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One is to ground goodness in God’s nature. This answers the question of whether an action is morally good because God commands it because it implies that God does not decide what is right and what is wrong on impulse. It is God’s nature to do good, and God never acts against his nature. God commands and speaks out of his character, not arbitrarily. This then answers the question of whether God commands an action because it is morally good because the foundation of morality is God’s nature and not some external principle to which God must follow. God’s sovereignty is then restored. Another argument for this theory is to try to show that if you believe in God, then you should accept this theory as the best moral theory. God is the most powerful being imaginable. Something that can approve or disapprove of actions by command is more powerful than something that cannot. Therefore, if God cannot approve or disapprove of actions by will then he is not the most powerful being imaginable, since we can think of something that can, but this is ridiculous if you believe in God. So, God has the power to make things right or wrong by …show more content…
I am a child of God, and it is my duty to do what he commands. In faith, I believe that God’s commands are for my own good. He loves us and wants to help us, not give us some unnecessary obligation. As our creator, he has the knowledge to know how we should live our lives, what works best, and what will cause the most happiness. With this belief, I have the hope that I will be able to live a moral life. Divine Command Theory gives us the answer to why we should be moral by holding us accountable for our actions by God. Those who commit evil acts will be punished, and those who live moral lives will be rewarded with eternal life. Given our human nature, some actions and character traits satisfy us, and some do not. For example, lying or committing murder will not help satisfy us as human beings. God created us with a certain nature. He could have created us differently, such as by making us flourish and be satisfied by lying or committing murder, but he did not. Therefore, we must live our lives indicating a love for God and other people if we want to be

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