The Case Against Affirmative Action

992 Words 4 Pages
Affirmative action, by definition, is an action or policy favoring those who tend to suffer from discrimination, especially in relation to employment or education. Using varying instruments and policies, Affirmative Action aims to help underrepresented groups have a better job opportunities or college admissions. Generations of people have been disadvantaged by institutionalized discrimination and one way to remedy this is to place a policy that evens out the playing field. There has been numerous legal cases against affirmative action concerning college admissions, and a few have made it as far as the Supreme Court including Bakke v. Regents, Univ. of California (1978), Grutter v. Bollinger (2003), Parents Involved v. Seattle School District …show more content…
The top 10 percent program guarantees admission to students who graduate in the top 10 percent of his or her high school class. About 92% of students during 2008 (Fisher’s college application year) entered via this program and the other 8% were admitted through holistic review where UT Austin used two scores (Lewn). One was calculated based on a student 's academic transcript and test scores. The other, called a personal achievement index, awarded points for two required essays, leadership, activities, service and special circumstances (Lewn). Those included socioeconomic status of the student or the student 's school, family makeup, prominent language spoken at home and race (Satija). The applicant’s scores from these two were averaged out and then compared to the rest of the students to determine their admission. UT’s argument for diversity within its student body, goes beyond race. Diversity of socioeconomic status, religious background, and community service, to name a few factors, help bring people of different background to enhance classroom dialogue and create a real world learning environment (Jones). This form of Affirmative Action is not all about race. Diversity, is a key ingredient in UT’s …show more content…
The Supreme Court has never ruled that the Constitution prohibits all laws and government programs that consider race, just that you cannot discriminate based on race (Jones). UT’s diversity goal, in fact does satisfy the constitutional requirement that “government racial classifications advance a compelling interest,” or strict scrutiny (Satija). Exposure to a diverse class allows students to learn the skills necessary to deal with people from different backgrounds, which can help in the real world. UT’s program is not a quota system, nor is UT attempting to gain a certain percentage of students from specific race backgrounds. They are not discriminating based on race. If UT has to pick between two students, one a upperclass star athlete with mediocre SAT scores, and the other a first generation college student with lower than average SAT scores, but has a part-time job to help pay the bills, and both happen to be of a different race it’s up to UT to take the students’ race as one factor from the array of factors in place to bring in the student that will succeed and offer the most to the school. UT aims to create a unique, diverse and challenging environment for educational purposes. The Supreme Court decided that diversity is a strong enough reason to allow UT to use race as one factor, however they must not rely on this type of

Related Documents