Taoism And Confucianism Case Study

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What six traditional Chinese beliefs and practices does Molloy specifically identify as having played a part in both Taoism and Confucianism? Describe each of these six briefly. Which do you think were probably most compatible with Buddhism? Why?

Molloy’s Six Influential Chinese Traditions/Beliefs:

Spirits- Ancient Chinese culture embodied spirits as being present in every circumstance of nature and the human world. Good spirits brought positive items to life. Bad spirits brought negative items to life. Rituals and sacrifices helped restore harmony.
Tian- Traditionally translated as “Heaven,” it is visualized as a remote spiritual entity that administers activities on earth and has a duty to identify what is right and what is wrong.
Veneration
…show more content…
The country as a whole has had a grand history of tradition and beliefs that gave definition to Taoism, Confucianism and Buddhism. Taoism (also termed Daoism) is a spiritual, philosophical and religious tradition of Chinese origin that emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao. The term Tao is defined as "way", "path" or "principle." Confucianism is based off the teachings of Confucius. It is often characterized as a system of social and ethical philosophy rather than a religion. Confucianism was influential to social values, institutions, and transcendent ideals of traditional Chinese society. Buddhism is a religion based on a variety of traditions, beliefs, and spiritual practices largely based on teachings attributed to Gautama Buddha, commonly referred to as the Buddha (“the awakened one”). His teachings encompassed life as full of suffering caused by desire and that the way to finish suffering was through enlightenment. Taoism, Confucianism and Buddhism, collectively termed the Three Doctrines, are the fabric of Chinese culture and history. Six traditional beliefs were integral to the backbone of Confucianism and Taoism; with some compatibility and integration into Buddhism. Chinese traditions and beliefs include the following elements: Spirits, Tian, Veneratin of Ancestors, Seeing Patterns in Nature, Yang and Yin, and Divination. Taoism and Confucianism ideology originated in China while Buddhism originated in India. Buddhism flourished into a major religion in China due to compatibility with some aspects of traditional Chinese culture and beliefs. Buddhism has most compatibility with the following Chinese ons and beliefs:

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