Overview Of Communist Manifesto By Karl Marx

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Since the initial publication of Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto in 1848, his work has sparked a variety of reactions and debates around the world. Deemed as one of the most influential and still relevant pieces of political propaganda today, the Communist Manifesto inspired nation building and affected social, political, and economic policies throughout the world. The Communist Manifesto outlined Marx’s vision of a socialist society, where everyone was equal, class hierarchies were abolished, private property was eliminated, and wealth was distributed equally amongst everyone. While many believed his ideology created what was to be thought as a utopia and perfect society, others were disturbed by one of his boldest predictions, which …show more content…
His main intention was to officially define communism and its true intention, which people still did not understand, while also conveying his predictions for an inevitable, future revolution in such a way that it could reach his target audience, the working class or the proletariats. His vision specifically portrays a Utopia, where he believes it is possible for classes to live in harmony without conflict or inequality. Ideally, this perfect society would be rid of all class distinctions, private property, and replaced with equality and peace. Throughout his Manifesto, Marx traces out the historical, constant class struggle between the upper class, the bourgeoisie, and the working class, the proletariat, where he discovers that, “Society as a whole is more and more splitting into two great hostile camps, into two great classes directly facing each other: Bourgeoisie and Proletariat" (Marx and Engels, 80). He believed that the conflict between the two classes was both inevitable, and also a necessary in order to initiate the revolution to end all class struggles once and for all. In fact, Marx studied these economic trends only to discover that throughout history these two …show more content…
On the surface, the story is seemingly simple; however Orwell wrote the novel with the purpose of conveying a secondary meaning beneath the literal one through the use of an allegory. That being said, the novel’s literal meaning is how farm the animals revolt to drive out humanity and create an equal society. Delving into the secondary meaning of the novel, Orwell created the animals as symbols to portray the key leaders who played a crucial role in the Russian Revolution and the creation of the Soviet Union. The character Old Major, a well respected boar, shares many characteristics with Karl Marx. Old Major’s creation of the theory Animalism mirrors that of Marx’s theory of a perfect socialist society, in which both encourage the working class, or the animals, to unite in a revolution to overthrow the government, the farmer, and thereafter create an equal, classless society. Meanwhile, the pigs represent the leaders of the communist party, including Joseph Stalin, who end up abusing Old Major’s vision for animalism to satisfy their own greedy needs for power and control over the farm. Both the events during and after animal revolution, signifies the events that also occurred during the Russian Revolution and the formation of the Soviet Union. After the

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