Transhumanist Subculture

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Subcultures and Social Trends: The Transhumanists – The Singularity and Modern Cyborgs http://s25.postimg.org/s6106wapr/binary_1536617_180.jpg It is estimated that somewhere around the year 2045, a technological singularity will occur- the point at which artificial intelligence outstrips human capacity; only it’s not quite the story as James Cameron portrayed it in his groundbreaking movie *The Terminator*. Rather, it would seem the singularity is closer to The Borg from the Star Trek Next Generation series.
The singularity’s slow march forward comes not in a rise of the machines, but in a world of surgically implanted LED lights to backlight tattoos, sub-dermal RFID chips and DIY wetware; all installed, not by licensed medical professionals,
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Idealistic expression turned into dark realization with the practice of eugenics in Sparta, where children deemed to have flaws or perceived deformities were left to die of exposure.
Modern day Transhumanist subculture can be dated back to the British geneticist J.B.S. Haldane in his 1923 essay, *Daedaleus: Science and the Future* where Haldane suggested the future applications of science and genetics would yield tremendous benefit to humans, and J.D. Bernal in his 1929 essay, *The World, The Flesh, and the Devil*, which speculated on the great benefits of space colonization and bionic implants to the human condition.
Fast forward to the present day world of the Do-It-Yourself Cyborg and the biohacker; where Transhumanism takes a more sci-fi, dystopian aura as people are creating and using hardware to upgrade their bodies, without waiting for the corporate development cycle to complete or the government authorities to regulate.
### What Exactly is a
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For example, large amounts of nerve endings are jammed into the fingertips, allowing humans to experience a very broad array of sensory information. Grinders would extend this sensory array spectrum by embedding super magnets from cellular phones into the tips of their fingers, so their fingers vibrate in the presence of electrical current. As synthesia develops, new neural pathway formation from these new sensations over time causes an almost sixth sense to appear, where one can intuitively sense what is giving off electromagnetic energy in a

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